Search results for "A. K. Carroll"

Food Shift Test Kitchen

WASTE NOT

Food Shift launches a test kitchen for a better food system

STORY AND PHOTO BY A. K. CARROLL

Dana Frasz plans to launch the Alameda Kitchen this spring.

Dana Frasz plans to launch the Alameda Kitchen this spring.

Food-waste activist Dana Frasz was blanching a massive vat of green beans when she first learned of Robert Egger, the man she would later describe as her “soul brother.” Egger is founder and president of DC Central Kitchen, an East Coast social enterprise that recycles food, distributes meals, fulfills catering contracts, and provides job training for unemployed adults.

“I was working at Ashoka [a network of social entrepreneurs who implement systems change on a global scale], and my team of 12 decided to do a volunteer day at DC Kitchen,” says Frasz, who was then in her third year as a project manager. “I was reading the articles on the walls and seeing pictures of Robert that I’ll never forget.” Egger’s combination of feeding hungry people, empowering vulnerable populations, and reducing food waste perfectly aligned with Frasz’s deepest passions.

Shortly after volunteering at DC Kitchen in June of 2010, Frasz told Egger of her plan to start her own project, and he agreed to support and advise her. Frasz went on to become the founder and director of the East Bay nonprofit Food Shift, which helps businesses and organizations reduce food waste.… Read More

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Open Doors

Opportunity Brewing

At 1951 Coffee, refugees gain job skills and
employment as their stories are brought into view

Story and photo by A.K. Carroll

 

Above: Rachel Taber, one of the 1951 Coffee founders, at work in the shop.

Above: Rachel Taber, one of the 1951 Coffee founders, at work in the shop.

What would it feel like to be separated from your country, culture, and the only home you’ve ever known? Grab a cup of Algorithm cold brew or Verve espresso at 2410 Channing Way, Berkeley, the home of 1951 Coffee Company, and begin your own journey toward understanding the refugee experience.

Just opened in January, 1951 Coffee is a center for caffeine, community, and cultural awareness. Engagement begins as you pass through the door: Colorful lines that run at angles along the floor lead you up to the counter. Evoking public transport routes that bring many refugees to relocation sites, the lines bleed onto the back wall and guide you to a corner where icons and statistics describe the long and circuitous journey a typical refugee follows toward resettlement—a process that can take up to 17 years. A corkboard map of the world shows the homeland of each 1951 Coffee barista and ties a hypothetical story to an actual person who just made your coffee.… Read More

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Our Contributors Spring 2016

Originally from the cornfields of Nebraska, Amanda Kuehn Carroll has spent most of her life wandering and wondering, often getting lost in the process. Her work has appeared in Diablo, 7×7, Saint Mary’s, San Francisco, Napa Sonoma,SF Weekly, and online at Berkeleyside. You can find links to her work at akakuehn.wix.com/clips and reach her at akakuehn@gmail.com.

Shanna Farrell is an oral historian with UC Berkeley’s Regional Oral History Office, where she is currently the lead for their West Coast Cocktails: An Oral History project. In addition to cocktail and spirit history, she works on environmental history. You can find her on Twitter as @shanna_farrell.

Erik Ferry is a dedicated East Bay locavore, organic gardener, and environmental grantwriting consultant with a varied background in conservation biology, livestock husbandry, and sustainable urban development. Learn more at ErikFerryLinkedIn.

Photographer Carolyn Fong shoots extensively for regional and national publications and commercial clients. She loves showcasing the diverse people who influence our culture’s understanding of how and what we eat and drink. After 15 years in New York City, Carolyn recently returned to the East Bay with her family. carolynfongphotography.com

Katie Gatlin, a professional baker and passionate food blogger, sees an undeniable link between food and happiness.… Read More

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Turn Up the Heat!

Whether you favor burgers, salmon, or tofu on the barbie, it’s time to clean your grill and get cooking.

One of the many fire-burning vessels pictured in Franklin Barbecue. Reprinted with permission from Franklin Barbecue by Aaron Franklin & Jordan Mackay, copyright © 2015. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. Photo: Wyatt McSpadden © 2015

In this newsletter:

●  The Local Butcher pops up at the farmers’ market – Tuesdays through October
●  Contemplate food ethics at Mrs. Dalloway’s – June 11
●  Dine with a chef and a revolutionary – June 14
●  Book Reviews: On Fire!
●  Recipe: The Local Butcher’s Grilled Lamb Chops with Chimichurri

 


 

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Sandos, Soups, and Pastured Meat at the Farmers’ Market

Meat-lovers favorite The Local Butcher Shop now hosts a summer stand at the Tuesday farmers’ market in South Berkeley. Stop by to enjoy a sandwich, hot soup, stew, or some beef jerky. A selection of frozen bone broth, stocks, and soups as well as tallow soap are available to take home. The market stand is open through October, with the weekly menu posted here.

At their Berkeley store, The Local Butcher Shop offers pastured meat sourced from within 150 miles of the shop.… Read More

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Medicineshed

If you visit the Ohlone Herbal Center and peruse the bookshelves, you may notice this drawing of a wolf preparing an herbal healing potion. Artist Laura Morrish says she draws her whimsical Algonquin-inspired animals, like the wolf Luna Sage, as totems for those who have galvanized her life.  Learn more at lecanotrouge.com.

If you visit the Ohlone Herbal Center and peruse the bookshelves, you may notice this drawing of a wolf preparing an herbal healing potion. Artist Laura Morrish says she draws her whimsical Algonquin-inspired animals, like the wolf Luna Sage, as totems for those who have galvanized her life. Learn more at lecanotrouge.com.

The Not-So-Slow Herbal Economy

By Jillian Laurel Steinberger

 

The herbal economy is vital. Viable. Brisk even. “Herbal” seems too positive a word to stick next to “economy,” given the latter’s tarnished associations. Yet, the existence of a thriving “right economy” enables people to freely pursue jobs they enjoy; that sustain them; that don’t take a hard toll on body, mind, and soul; that contribute to resilient communities. We want people who do herby things to thrive economically because it’s an indicator—a bellwether—that the rest of us may also thrive without resorting to work that makes us, or the planet, sick.

Perhaps, then, we might look at the East Bay’s busy herbal economy as a sign of economic health. Here, we have many diverse sages, teachers, and mentors, as well as adoring students who pay tuition while developing their careers. We are blessed with a plethora of practitioners and the grateful clients who seek them out.… Read More

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Uncommon Exchange

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Doug Reil gives Maria Myers the produce donated to Cafeina.

Uncommon Exchange

Doug Reil serves up a radical idea in food sharing

By Rachel Trachten
Photos by Nicki Rosario

If you’re looking for a tasty meal made from locally sourced produce this season, but are not quite up for Chez Panisse, consider Cafeína Organic Café, Bua Luang Thai, or Tay Tah Café in Albany, or Elevation 66 Brewing Company in El Cerrito. At these humble little eateries, you might enjoy something even “The Chez” can’t serve up: a dish made with hyper-local produce.

Yes, hyper-local. Think: grown within 10 miles.

The produce is being served at these spots thanks to a local activist and book publisher named Doug Reil. His “Garden to Table” initiative, launched last summer, is providing a way for home gardeners in the Albany-Berkeley-El Cerrito corridor to connect with local restaurants that might like to serve their produce.

And while this would seem like an admirable exercise in extreme locavorism, it’s actually more than that. Reil is interested in community-building, and he’s also conducting an experiment in alternative economy.

He got the idea when his company, the nonprofit North Atlantic Books, published Sacred Economics by Charles Eisenstein. Reil was struck by Eisenstein’s notion that our current economy, focused on money and growth, is unsustainable in the long run.… Read More

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