Archive | Recipes

Fennel and Chicken Braised with Lemon

La Vie Rustic: Cooking and Living in the French Style 
by Georgeanne Brennan

Published by Weldon Owen
Photography by Sara Remington
 
Fennel is good both raw and cooked. Cooking transforms its distinct licorice flavor into an almost-sweet back note. From the garden, I like to use very young fennel for pickles and the larger, more robust bulbs for gratins and in braised dishes like this one. Since I have Meyer lemon trees at my house in California, I use them here, though any variety will work. 
 
Serves 4
 
1 large or 2 medium fennel bulbs with stalks and fronds 
2 lemons, preferably Meyer, halved then cut into 3 pieces 
1 teaspoon sea salt 
6 chicken thighs, with or without skin 
2 cloves garlic, minced 
1 teaspoon dried oregano 
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper 
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 
½ cup dry white wine 
2 tablespoons grated lemon zest 
¼ cup green olives, pitted 
 
Trim the stalks from the fennel, reserving the lacy tips of the fronds for garnish. Cut the fennel bulb lengthwise into ¼-inch slices—the slices will look like hands. Cut the fennel “hands” lengthwise into ½-inch slices. Set aside. 
 
Put the cut lemons in a bowl and sprinkle with the salt.… Read More

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Chocolate Shortbread

From: A Day in a Life Full of Chocolate by Anita Chu


Recipe provided by Caroline Romanski

Makes about 60 cookies

1 ⅔ cups all purpose flour
3 tablespoons Valrhona cocoa powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1 pinch ground cinnamon
1 ¼ soft unsalted butter
½ cup granulated sugar
¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
About 2 egg yolks for egg wash
Turbinado sugar for coating

Sift together flour, cocoa powder, salt, and cinnamon. Set aside. In a mixing bowl with paddle attachment, cream the butter with the sugar and vanilla extract just until combined—do not overbeat.

Gradually and on low speed, add the sifted flour mixture. Mix to form a smooth dough. Divide dough into two pieces and roll into logs about 15” long. Wrap the logs in plastic or parchment paper and refrigerate until firm. The dough can be stored in the freezer for up to 2 weeks.

Preheat oven to 300°. Remove a log of dough from refrigerator and let sit for about 10 minutes at room temperature to soften slightly. If you only intend to bake part of the log, cut off the appropriate portion and return the rest to the refrigerator.

Make an egg wash by combining 2 egg yolks with a little bit of water.… Read More

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Wild Mushroom Stew with Polenta for a Ski-Touring Dinner

From Roadside Diaries: Sierra Adventures, Part I  by Cheryl Koehler

There is no reason not to have a gourmet feast while out in the wilderness when one can choose a dish like this made with durable lightweight tools and ingredients. The presentation makes a great impression on fellow campers. Serves 4 (or maybe only 2, if they are extremely hungry). (This recipe is adapted from The Cooking of South-West France by Paula Wolfert.)

For the Stew

1 ounce dried wild mushrooms
1 pound fresh mushrooms, one variety, or a mixture
(substitute an additional 2 ounces dried mushrooms if you don’t want to pack in fresh ones)
3 tablespoons olive oil (or duck fat)
3 ounces prosciutto or dry ham (such as Westphalian), chopped
2 shallots, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
5 sun-dried tomatoes, chopped
¾ cup white wine
Salt and pepper, to taste
2 – 4 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1 lemon

For the Polenta

½ cup stone-ground cornmeal or polenta (you might want to use the quick-cooking variety)
2 cups water

Place dried wild mushrooms in a bowl with enough hot water to cover. After they have soaked for about 30 minutes, remove from soaking water and set aside as you strain soaking water through a coffee filter to remove the grit.… Read More

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Perfumed Matsutake Rice

From Urban Forager: Matsu=Pine, Take=Mushroom by Anthony Tassinello

3 cups Japanese rice
3 cups water
2 or 3 small “number one” matsutake
1 abura-age – fried tofu (optional)
¼ cup sake
¼ cup soy sauce

Begin by washing the rice in several changes of cold water, repeating the process until the water becomes clear. Drain the rice thoroughly. Add rice and water to rice cooker and let stand for 30 minutes. In the meantime clean the mushrooms of all loose dirt using a firm brush or paring knife. You may peel back a bit of the thin outer layer if overly dirty. Using the large holes of a box grater, shred the mushrooms lengthwise into long strands. Alternatively, if using your hands, pull apart into small rough pieces of the same size. If using the optional fried tofu, cut into strips. Add the mushrooms, tofu, sake and soy sauce to the rice cooker, cover and follow manufacturer’s instructions for cooking.

Serves 6 as part of a larger meal

Resist the urge to treat matsutake in a western style cooking fashion (i.e., sautéing or frying in fat) as the essence of the mushroom will be lost and will result in a bland, tough dish.… Read More

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Zucchini, Two Ways

 
As the weather warms up, zucchini and other summer squash are plentiful at local farmers’ markets. Chef Maria Capdevielle, a cooking instructor at Kitchen on Fire, shares two of her favorite zucchini recipes to enhance your summertime meals.
 
Roasted Zucchini with Mint Pesto
 
For the pesto:
½ cup loosely packed fresh basil leaves
½ cup loosely packet fresh mint leaves
1 large clove fresh garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon salt
½ cup Parmigiano Reggiano cheese
¼ cup pine nuts
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  
For the zucchini:
4 zucchini
1 teaspoon salt
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
¼ teaspoon pepper
 
To make the pesto, process all the pesto ingredients together in a food processor or blender.
 
To make the zucchini, preheat oven to 400°F. Thinly slice zucchini lengthwise, brush lightly with olive oil, and sprinkle lightly with salt and black pepper. Roast 25 minutes, tossing halfway through. Alternatively you can grill them one minute on each side. Remove and cool. Spread about 1 teaspoon of pesto on one side of each grilled zucchini slice; roll up and serve.
 
 
Zucchini Blossom Fritters


 
Chef Capdevielle recommends these fritters as a perfect summer appetizer.… Read More

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Plum Shrub

From Helen Krayenhoff’s 12 Simple Seasonal Vegetable Recipe Ideas

Finely dice 2 cups ripe plums and mix with 2 cups white balsamic vinegar and ½ cup sugar.
Put the pits in a jar, pour in fruit mixture, and seal. Age in a dark, cool place for 2 to 3 weeks,
then strain into a bottle and refrigerate.

Use 2 tablespoons of shrub in an 8-ounce glass with ice. Top with sparkling water. Use in cocktails.

Variation: For added complexity, add some black pepper, ginger, or lemon verbena to fruit before aging.

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Spicy Chicken Wrap

From Baking Without Borders by Sarah Henry | Illustrations by Margo Rivera-Weiss

The filling for Reem Assil’s Middle Eastern flatbread pays homage to traditional Palestinian cooking (roast chicken and sumac) with a nod to the Golden State (hello arugula). It’s a flavor-filled cross-cultural wrap. Pair with your preferred hot sauce, as desired.
—SH

Makes 4

Dough
1 tablespoon sugar
1½ teaspoons active dry yeast
Kosher salt (use 2 teaspoons Diamond Crystal or 1 teaspoon Morton brand)
3¼ cups bread flour, plus more for surface
2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more for bowl

Chicken and assembly
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided, plus more for drizzling
1 small onion, chopped
1 pound skinless, boneless chicken thighs (about 4)
1 tablespoon ground sumac (find at Middle Eastern markets and specialty foods stores)
Kosher salt (use 2 teaspoons Diamond Crystal or 1 teaspoon Morton brand)
¼ teaspoon bahārāt*
Bread flour (for dusting)
1 cup trimmed arugula
2 tablespoons pomegranate seeds

To make dough

Whisk together the sugar, yeast, and ½ cup warm water (105°–110°) in a medium-size bowl until yeast is dissolved. Let sit until foamy, 5 to 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, whisk together salt and 3¼ cups flour in a large bowl. Make a well in the center and pour in yeast mixture, 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, and ¾ cup warm water.… Read More

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Three Stone Fruit Honey Butter


This recipe is a great example of a product that brings together many values we have around food at Three Stone Hearth. We source all ingredients seasonally from small, ethical farms and producers. Raw honey, the only added sweetener, is a food considered medicine in India’s Ayurvedic tradition. The generous amount of butter in the recipe adds deliciousness as it buffers sweetness and slows down the metabolism of the natural sugars. Dollop the honey butter on oatmeal, slather it onto pancakes, stir into yogurt, spread onto toast, or eat it straight with a spoon. It’s a perfect pick-me-up at work when you need a little energy boost.

2½ pounds mixed stone fruit, preferably three different kinds, such as peaches, plums, and apricots, from your favorite local farms
2–3 sticks pastured, organic butter
½–¾ cup raw local honey
Lemon juice to taste
Pinch of sea salt

Pit and slice the fruit and place in a heavy-bottomed pan over medium-low heat, cooking until it becomes a concentrated paste. (Add splashes of water as you go if the fruit isn’t super-juicy.) Remove from heat and purée with an immersion blender. Add the butter and stir until melted and incorporated into the fruit. Then transfer the mixture to a bowl and allow to cool to body temperature (about 100°).… Read More

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The Fork’s Grilled Cheese Sandwich with Toma, Peach Chutney, and Basil


Makes 4 sandwiches

Peach Chutney:
2 teaspoons olive oil
1 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds
1 small yellow onion, finely diced
½ cup sugar
1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon finely chopped peeled fresh ginger
¼ teaspoon dried red pepper flakes
4 firm but ripe peaches (about 1½ pounds), pitted and cut into 1-inch chunks
½ teaspoon salt

Sandwich:
8 slices whole wheat sourdough bread
8 ounces Point Reyes Toma, shredded
4 ounces Point Reyes Fresh Mozzarella, drained and pulled apart
3 tablespoons thinly sliced fresh basil
4 tablespoons butter, softened

To make the chutney: Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add mustard seeds and sauté for about 30 seconds, until they begin to pop. Add onion and sauté until translucent, 3–4 minutes. Stir in sugar, vinegar, ginger, and pepper flakes. Cook until sugar dissolves, stirring occasionally. Add peaches and cook about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until fruit is tender and a thick syrup has formed. Stir in salt. Remove from heat.

To make sandwiches: Spread four slices of bread with a tablespoon each of chutney. Distribute Toma and mozzarella evenly over chutney. Finish with fresh basil. Press remaining bread slices firmly on top. Butter outside of the top and bottom slices of bread.… Read More

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Conscious Kitchen Better Burgers

From School Lunch Gets Fresh by Rachel Trachten | Photos by Carmen Silva

 

Serves 4

1½ pounds organic, grass-fed ground beef
1 carrot, peeled
1 beet, peeled
½ white onion, peeled
2–4 mushrooms
1–3 cloves garlic, peeled
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt
Black pepper

Grind raw vegetables in a meat grinder or a food processor (pulse setting). Mix vegetables and oil with ground beef (or other ground meat). Form into burger patties and season with salt and pepper. (Make one small patty and cook to check on the seasoning.) Pan fry or grill.

At Madera Elementary, the burgers were served on whole-wheat buns with fresh lettuce and kale. The kids added their own ketchup and mustard.

betterburgerchallenge.org

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