Archive | Recipes

Roasted Watermelon Radishes

From What’s in Season by Barbara Kobsar  Illustration by Caroline H. Gould

 

Serves 4

1 pound watermelon radishes, trim off top and root
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
½ teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon minced thyme, rosemary, or basil (optional)

Preheat oven to 400°. Cut prepared radishes into ½-inch wedges. Mix radishes with olive oil in a 2-quart baking dish and dot with butter. Roast, stirring occasionally, until fork tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Sprinkle with salt and herbs to serve.

Veteran journalist Barbara Kobsar has authored two cookbooks focusing on traditional home-cooked meals using local produce. You’ll find her each week at the Walnut Creek Farmers’ Market selling her Cottage Kitchen jams and jellies made from farmers’ market produce.

Berkeley-based illustrator and musician Caroline H. Gould is a transplant from Brooklyn, New York. She is especially fond of illustrating desserts. carolinehgould.com

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Lorraine Battle’s Apple Cake

From They Always Wore Aprons.  Story and photos By Helen Krayenhoff

 

This “cake” is a pure celebration of the apple. Use different varieties—some sweet, some tart.
12–17 apples 
Zest of 1 orange, finely grated
1 tablespoon organic sugar
2 5-inch ramekins, lightly buttered

Preheat oven to 300°.

Peel and core apples and slice very thinly by hand, on a mandolin, or in the food processor (use 3mm disk).
Finely grate the zest of one orange and mix zest with sugar.

Build the cakes in the ramekins by carefully piling the slices in differing directions to make as solid a structure as possible. Every third or fourth layer sprinkle a pinch of the orange sugar mixture. When you reach the top, tie a collar of parchment paper around the dish and secure with cotton string. Collar should reach 3-4 inches above the top of the ramekin. Continue building up the apples until you have reached the top of the collar.

Cut a small circle of parchment paper to fit on top of the apples and weigh down apples with a smaller ramekin or another kind of flat-bottomed ovenproof dish that fits inside the paper ring. Place ramekins in a baking dish to catch overflow liquid and place in oven.… Read More

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Chef Tu David Phu’s Lemongrass Beef

From Flavors of Home by Alix Wall


“I always get a lot of questions on how to use lemongrass. The most common remark is, ‘I never seem to extract the lemongrass flavor.’ My answer is that you have to use a lot of lemongrass, and that you will either have to bruise the stalk or chop it very finely. 

“People also ask, ‘Which fish sauce do I use? How do I apply it?’ I prefer Three Crab brand fish sauce for adding to sauces that won’t be cooked, since the brand seems to lose its salty flavor with long cooking. Squid brand fish sauce is saltier and is great for marinades.” —Chef Tu David Phu

1 stalk lemongrass
3 tablespoons Squid brand fish sauce 
1 tablespoon organic sugar
5 whole garlic cloves, peeled
1 pound filet mignon, tri-tip, or skirt steak

Prepare lemongrass by cutting away the bottom half inch of the stalk. (This part is very woody and should be saved for broths or soups.) Cut the stalks into ½-inch segments and chop finely in a food processor. Add garlic cloves, fish sauce, and sugar. Blend to a fine paste, about 1 minute. Place beef into a zip-top bag with the marinade, making sure to coat all of the beef.… Read More

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Cambodian-Style Chicken Salad

Nite Yun’s Nyam Sach Moan

From Noodle Soup Epiphanies
by Sarah Henry, photography by Robin Jolin


(Cambodian-style chicken salad)
This Khmer dish is served at festive occasions, such as weddings, New Year’s parties, and other celebrations. The fish sauce gives it a distinctly Cambodian flavor. Yun gives it a Northern California twist by including seasonal greens and other vegetables beyond the common cabbage.
Serves 4–6

1 chicken breast
2 cups chicken stock
2 cloves garlic, crushed
4–5 sprigs thyme

For sweet fish sauce dressing:
¼ cup fish sauce
¼ cup vinegar
¼ cup sugar
1 cup water
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced

For salad:
½ head cabbage, shredded
2 handfuls of loose organic greens (mizuna or arugula)
2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced
1 bunch mint, leaves only
1 bunch Thai basil, leaves only
1 Persian cucumber, thinly sliced
1 bird’s eye chili, chopped
2 tablespoons crushed roasted peanuts

To poach the chicken breast, place stock, garlic, and thyme into a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, add chicken, return to boil, and then reduce heat to low. Simmer, covered, for 15 minutes or until chicken is just cooked through. Turn off heat and leave chicken in liquid for 5 minutes. Remove meat from liquid and allow to cool on a plate.… Read More

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Asian-Inspired Celery Salad

 

Recipe provided by StopFoodWaste.org from Food Storage Tips

 

Serves 4

For the dressing: In a small bowl, combine
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons sesame oil
2 teaspoons sugar
1¼ teaspoons grated ginger
2 teaspoons lemon juice
2 teaspoons fish sauce (or ½ teaspoon salt).

Whisk together.

For the salad:
Cut 5 celery stalks across the ribs into ¼-inch slices.
Julienne 3 carrots.
Mince 1 green jalapeño (or more to taste).

Place vegetables in a serving bowl and toss with the dressing.
Garnish with ½ cup chopped, roasted peanuts and 1 tablespoon chopped cilantro.

Serve.

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Storage tip series: Throughout the fall season, Edible East Bay’s e-newsletter will feature more storage tips and recipes from StopWaste. Sign up for the newsletter at edibleeastbay.com or search the website blog for the series.
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Lo Coco’s Linguine Tutto Mare

From Growing Up with Giovanni LoCoco
by Mary Tillson and Cheryl Angelina Koehler

Photo courtesy of Lo Coco

Suzanne Lo Coco says her father was as proprietary about his fish broth recipe as he was about the one for the family pizza dough, and she risks causing him to turn over in his grave if she reveals anything more than that he made the broth using a whole rock cod. Regardless of whether you make your own or buy a good prepared stock from your local fishmonger, be sure to simmer it with some saffron threads.

Serves 6

1½ pounds Manila clams, rinsed well
1 pound black mussels, rinsed well
12 extra-large jumbo scallops (or 2–3 per person), sliced ¼-inch thick
12 prawns (or 2–3 per person), peeled and deveined
1 cup fish broth (homemade or purchased) with 1 teaspoon saffron threads added
1 head garlic, peeled
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
¼ cup chopped Italian parsley (set aside 2 tablespoons for assembly)
¾ cup dry white wine (avoid chardonnay)
1½–2 whole lemons
½ cup water, or more as needed
½ cup crushed San Marzano or other pear-shaped tomatoes
3–4 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons chopped fresh sweet basil
1 pound linguine (At Lo Coco’s, we prefer the Italian De Cecco brand)
Salt and pepper to taste
Dash chili flakes (optional)

This recipe requires about 45–60 minutes of cooking time, provided you have accomplished all the prep tasks such as cleaning the seafood.… Read More

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Fennel and Chicken Braised with Lemon

La Vie Rustic: Cooking and Living in the French Style 
by Georgeanne Brennan

Published by Weldon Owen
Photography by Sara Remington
 
Fennel is good both raw and cooked. Cooking transforms its distinct licorice flavor into an almost-sweet back note. From the garden, I like to use very young fennel for pickles and the larger, more robust bulbs for gratins and in braised dishes like this one. Since I have Meyer lemon trees at my house in California, I use them here, though any variety will work. 
 
Serves 4
 
1 large or 2 medium fennel bulbs with stalks and fronds 
2 lemons, preferably Meyer, halved then cut into 3 pieces 
1 teaspoon sea salt 
6 chicken thighs, with or without skin 
2 cloves garlic, minced 
1 teaspoon dried oregano 
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper 
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 
½ cup dry white wine 
2 tablespoons grated lemon zest 
¼ cup green olives, pitted 
 
Trim the stalks from the fennel, reserving the lacy tips of the fronds for garnish. Cut the fennel bulb lengthwise into ¼-inch slices—the slices will look like hands. Cut the fennel “hands” lengthwise into ½-inch slices. Set aside. 
 
Put the cut lemons in a bowl and sprinkle with the salt.… Read More

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Chocolate Shortbread

From: A Day in a Life Full of Chocolate by Anita Chu


Recipe provided by Caroline Romanski

Makes about 60 cookies

1 ⅔ cups all purpose flour
3 tablespoons Valrhona cocoa powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1 pinch ground cinnamon
1 ¼ soft unsalted butter
½ cup granulated sugar
¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
About 2 egg yolks for egg wash
Turbinado sugar for coating

Sift together flour, cocoa powder, salt, and cinnamon. Set aside. In a mixing bowl with paddle attachment, cream the butter with the sugar and vanilla extract just until combined—do not overbeat.

Gradually and on low speed, add the sifted flour mixture. Mix to form a smooth dough. Divide dough into two pieces and roll into logs about 15” long. Wrap the logs in plastic or parchment paper and refrigerate until firm. The dough can be stored in the freezer for up to 2 weeks.

Preheat oven to 300°. Remove a log of dough from refrigerator and let sit for about 10 minutes at room temperature to soften slightly. If you only intend to bake part of the log, cut off the appropriate portion and return the rest to the refrigerator.

Make an egg wash by combining 2 egg yolks with a little bit of water.… Read More

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Wild Mushroom Stew with Polenta for a Ski-Touring Dinner

From Roadside Diaries: Sierra Adventures, Part I  by Cheryl Koehler

There is no reason not to have a gourmet feast while out in the wilderness when one can choose a dish like this made with durable lightweight tools and ingredients. The presentation makes a great impression on fellow campers. Serves 4 (or maybe only 2, if they are extremely hungry). (This recipe is adapted from The Cooking of South-West France by Paula Wolfert.)

For the Stew

1 ounce dried wild mushrooms
1 pound fresh mushrooms, one variety, or a mixture
(substitute an additional 2 ounces dried mushrooms if you don’t want to pack in fresh ones)
3 tablespoons olive oil (or duck fat)
3 ounces prosciutto or dry ham (such as Westphalian), chopped
2 shallots, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
5 sun-dried tomatoes, chopped
¾ cup white wine
Salt and pepper, to taste
2 – 4 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1 lemon

For the Polenta

½ cup stone-ground cornmeal or polenta (you might want to use the quick-cooking variety)
2 cups water

Place dried wild mushrooms in a bowl with enough hot water to cover. After they have soaked for about 30 minutes, remove from soaking water and set aside as you strain soaking water through a coffee filter to remove the grit.… Read More

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Perfumed Matsutake Rice

From Urban Forager: Matsu=Pine, Take=Mushroom by Anthony Tassinello

3 cups Japanese rice
3 cups water
2 or 3 small “number one” matsutake
1 abura-age – fried tofu (optional)
¼ cup sake
¼ cup soy sauce

Begin by washing the rice in several changes of cold water, repeating the process until the water becomes clear. Drain the rice thoroughly. Add rice and water to rice cooker and let stand for 30 minutes. In the meantime clean the mushrooms of all loose dirt using a firm brush or paring knife. You may peel back a bit of the thin outer layer if overly dirty. Using the large holes of a box grater, shred the mushrooms lengthwise into long strands. Alternatively, if using your hands, pull apart into small rough pieces of the same size. If using the optional fried tofu, cut into strips. Add the mushrooms, tofu, sake and soy sauce to the rice cooker, cover and follow manufacturer’s instructions for cooking.

Serves 6 as part of a larger meal

Resist the urge to treat matsutake in a western style cooking fashion (i.e., sautéing or frying in fat) as the essence of the mushroom will be lost and will result in a bland, tough dish.… Read More

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