Archive | Beverages

Chef Phillip’s Pumpkin Chai

From the story A Vegan Holiday Feast, Illustration by Julia Cost

Serves 8

1 small sugar pie pumpkin
4 cups almond milk
½–1 cup maple syrup, depending on desired sweetness
1⁄3 cup Darjeeling tea leaves
1-inch piece fresh ginger
1 cinnamon stick
10 black peppercorns
5 allspice berries
4 green cardamom pods
2 cloves
1 star anise
1 vanilla bean, split

Preheat oven to 425°. Split pumpkin in half, remove seeds, and place in a roasting pan with ¼ cup water. Cover and roast for 45 minutes. When pumpkin is soft, remove from oven and allow to cool. Then scrape flesh from shell into the jar of a blender. (Compost the shell or use it to make stock.)

Place 3¾ cups water in a saucepan and add almond milk, maple syrup, tea leaves, and all the spices. Bring to a boil, cover tightly, remove from heat, and let steep for 10 minutes. Strain to remove all solids and add 2 cups of this tea to blender with the roasted pumpkin flesh. Purée well and then stir into the remaining tea. Serve hot in mugs.

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Distiller Farid’s Polka Dot Citrus Cocktail

From the story A Vegan Holiday Feast Illustration by Julia Cost

Serves 1

2 ounces Botanica Spiritvs Gin (or gin of choice)
1 blood orange
1 Meyer lemon (Farid says, “Try bergamot orange instead for a killer fragrant cocktail.”)
3 ounces Q Tonic (Use this for a vegan drink, since it’s sweetened with agave nectar. Otherwise, use your favorite tonic.)
1 sprig rosemary (pick a fresh, young sprig)

Slice the blood orange in half. Thinly slice one half for garnish, then squeeze the other half to produce about 1 ounce juice. Do the same thing with the lemon to produce garnish and about ¼ ounce of juice.

Line the sides of a collins glass with the orange and lemon slices to create a polka dot pattern. Then fill the glass with ice, taking care not to disturb the citrus slices. Combine the gin, citrus juice, and tonic in a cocktail shaker and pour into the citrus-lined glass. Dress with a sprig of rosemary.

botanicagin.com

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Spicy Coconut Hot Chocolate

from 12 Simple Pepper and Chile Ideas by Helen Krayenhoff

Combine 1 can coconut milk and 1 cup water in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower to a simmer and whisk in 1 to 1 ½ ounces of an 80% chocolate bar until dissolved. Add 1 teaspoon ground guajillo chile and whisk until completely combined. Sweeten to taste with maple syrup, and add a pinch of cayenne if you want more heat.

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Plum Shrub

From Helen Krayenhoff’s 12 Simple Seasonal Vegetable Recipe Ideas

Finely dice 2 cups ripe plums and mix with 2 cups white balsamic vinegar and ½ cup sugar.
Put the pits in a jar, pour in fruit mixture, and seal. Age in a dark, cool place for 2 to 3 weeks,
then strain into a bottle and refrigerate.

Use 2 tablespoons of shrub in an 8-ounce glass with ice. Top with sparkling water. Use in cocktails.

Variation: For added complexity, add some black pepper, ginger, or lemon verbena to fruit before aging.

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Emerald Glow

Edible-Juiced---22

Recipe courtesy of Super Juiced.

Emanne co-owner of Super Juiced says to make sure all produce is organic and preferably from a local farmers’ market.
Makes one 12-ounce serving

4 Swiss chard and/or collard leaves
6 leaves of romaine lettuce
3 stalks of celery
1 Granny Smith apple
1 handful of mint
Juice from half a lemon

When selecting a juicer find one with a large chute so you don’t have to spend extra time prepping produce to fit.
Alternate feeding greens down the chute with apples. This will help you get the most juice out.
Drink right away to maximize the nutritional benefit.

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Kate’s Propolis Bitters

From DIY: Do It For the Bees

 

Honor the bees by misting your propolis bitters over the drink through a handmade bee stencil like the one pictured on the right, which was cut from the lid of a fresh herb container. Download a pdf of this pattern.

Honor the bees by misting your propolis bitters over the drink through a handmade bee stencil like the one pictured on the right, which was cut from the lid of a fresh herb container. Download a pdf of this pattern. Photo by Erin Scott

After years of awakening the magic of spirits in her bartending, Kate August has gone on from the restaurant world to forge a career in herbalism, helping folks raise their personal spirits to new and beneficial heights. Whether behind the counter at Oakland’s Homestead Apothecary or helping her private clients live healthier lives through herbs, she espouses the idea that you are what you drink.

4 ounces clove tincture (recipe below)
4 ounces propolis tincture* (see below for sources)
Peel of half an orange

Combine ingredients and let macerate for 2 days, then strain off the alcohol and compost the peel.

Clove Tincture: Macerate 2 parts cloves in 3 parts El Dorado 151 Rum for one week. Strain off the alcohol and compost the cloves.

What is propolis?
This sticky combination of collected plant resins and other hive products (such as beeswax, essential oils, and pollen) is sometimes called “bee glue” for the way bees use it to seal holes and cracks in the hive.Read More

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Tamir’s Bees Knees

From DIY: Do It For the Bees

Photo by Erin Scott

Photo by Erin Scott

Adapted from William “Cocktail Bill” Boothby’s 1934 version of World Drinks and How to Mix Them. His 1930 edition of this book was the earliest known printed recipe for the Bees Knees. The recipe included orange juice, which most bartenders today disregard. Our recipe uses orange curaçao.

1.5 ounces Miller’s Westbourne Strength Gin (or your preferred gin)
1 ounce E.G. Flewellen spring honey solution
.75 ounces lemon juice
.5 ounces of Marian Farmhouse California Style Curaçao
Lemon twist

Place all ingredients in a cocktail shaker. Fill shaker 2/3 full with ice and shake vigorously. Strain through a fine-mesh strainer into a cocktail glass. Twist lemon peel over the glass and drop it into the cocktail.

Honey Solution: Wildflowers lend a unique flavor profile to honey when nectar is collected in spring versus summer. But either way, to make E.G. Flewellen’s honey solution, stir together honey and water (at room temperature) in equal parts by volume until completely mixed. The easiest way to do this is to pour out the entire jar of honey into a container and add water to the emptied jar. Then pour the water into the container with the honey and stir away.… Read More

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Johann’s Easy Honey Mead

From DIY: Do It For the Bees

This proportion of 1 part honey to 2 parts water yields a semi-dry mead. The equipment and yeast can be found at any local brewery supply store. You can use beer, Champagne, or wine yeast. D47 white wine yeast works really well.

Makes approximately 5 wine bottle portions

2 one-gallon glass jugs
1 venting cap
51/3 cups honey
102/3 cups distilled water
1 package yeast (see above)
5 wine bottles
5 cork stoppers

Wash and then sterilize the jug, venting cap, funnels or anything else that will touch the brew with a solution of 1 tablespoon bleach to 1 gallon.
Fill the glass jug with the honey and distilled water. Add the yeast according to package directions. Then attach the venting cap and fill airlock halfway with water. Set the jug in a dark place. Within a day the airlock should start bubbling and within a few days it should be bubbling briskly.

After 2 to 3 weeks the fermentation will slow to less than one bubble every five seconds. The liquid inside should be clear with a thick sediment of trub (sediment) on the bottom. The mead is now ready to be racked.… Read More

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Beekeeper’s Bumble Bee

From DIY: Do It For the Bees

Honor the bees by misting your propolis bitters over the drink through a handmade bee stencil like the one pictured on the right, which was cut from the lid of a fresh herb container. Download a pdf of this pattern.

Honor the bees by misting your propolis bitters over the drink through a handmade bee stencil like the one pictured on the right, which was cut from the lid of a fresh herb container. Download a pdf of this pattern. Photo by Erin Scott

Adapted from Charles H. Baker Jr.’s The South American Gentleman’s Companion, this variation of the original Bumble Bee subs out half of the rum for Armagnac and uses propolis bitters as an aromatic instead of angostura bitters.

1 ounce Hamilton Jamaican Pot Still Black Rum 
1 ounce Tariquet VS Armagnac
1 ounce E.G. Flewellen’s mid-summer honey solution
.75 ounces lime juice
.5 ounces egg white
Kate’s propolis bitters (see below) in a spray bottle for garnish

Place all ingredients except bitters in a cocktail shaker. Shake hard for 5 seconds without ice. Add ice to fill one-third of your shaker. Shake vigorously. Strain through a fine mesh strainer into a cocktail glass. Garnish with three sprays of bitters over the cocktail.

Propolis Bitters Spray: Mix equal parts Hamilton Demerara 151 rum and propolis bitters (below) Pour into a cocktail mister (aka martini mister or martini atomizer).

Honor the bees by misting your propolis bitters over the drink through a handmade bee stencil like the one pictured on the right, which was cut from the lid of a fresh herb container.Read More

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California Julep

From the story An East Bay Winter Whiskey Ramble by Serena Bartlett

 

I learned about this combination from the restaurant manager at Oakland’s di Bartolo, a knowledgeable chap with many innovative drink ideas up his sleeve. You may need to wait until next summer to make it, but some of us planned ahead and cut up a locally grown watermelon into cubes and tucked them into the freezer.

4 cups frozen watermelon cubes
1 bunch fresh spearmint
Juice of one lime
½ cup simple syrup
Whiskey

Place the frozen watermelon cubes in a mixing bowl and use a hand blender to mix until textured but smooth. Stir in simple syrup and blend. Muddle the mint in each glass and sprinkle with lime juice. Fill each glass with the watermelon mixture and leave room for a healthy float of whiskey.

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