Archive | Condiments

Locavore Mayonnaise

When I make this mayonnaise, which is frequently, I rarely measure. I just start with one egg yolk and do everything to taste and to texture (or until my arm gets tired).

  • 1 egg yolk (I always use eggs from pastured chickens)
  • ½ cup local olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon prepared mustard (or make your own by harvesting seeds from a local field and grinding them yourself)
  • Juice of half a lemon, or up to 1 teaspoon vinegar
  • Sea salt to taste
  • ¼ cup yogurt cream or crème fraîche
  • Optional: Black pepper and/or other spices and herbs as desired
  • Optional: 1 clove garlic, minced

Put egg yolk into a small bowl. (It can be helpful to put a towel under the bowl to stabilize it). Begin whisking in olive oil drop by drop and then in a very thin stream, incorporating the oil completely as you whisk. (Use an electric mixer if you prefer.) Once you’ve got the emulsion started you can add the olive oil thicker and faster. Still whisking, add mustard, lemon juice, sea salt, and yogurt cream to taste. Add black pepper and/or any other spices or herbs as desired. To make aioli, add the clove of minced garlic at this time.… Read More

Continue Reading

Brown Turkey Fig Jam with Sherry & Fennel

This recipe is adapted from The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook by Rachel

Saunders (Andrews McMeel Publishing). The book gives more detailed instructions on testing the jam for doneness as well as on how to sterilize and process the jars.

  • 8–9 eight-ounce canning jars and lids
  • 4 . pounds stemmed brown turkey figs
  • 2 pounds 2 ounces white cane sugar
  • 3 scant teaspoons fennel seeds
  • 2 ounces cream sherry or Marsala
  • 2 ounces strained freshly squeezed lemon juice

Slice 1. pounds of the figs into sixths or, if the figs are very large, into eighths. Combine the slivered figs with the sugar in a large heatproof mixing bowl and let macerate while you proceed with the recipe.

Place the remaining 2. pounds of figs in a stainless-steel kettle wide enough to hold them in a single layer. Add enough cold water to make a .-inch layer in the bottom of the pan. Cover the pan and bring the fruit to a simmer over medium-high heat.  Stir, decrease the heat to medium-low, cover again, and cook for 5 minutes. Then, using a potato masher, crush the figs well to release their juices. Stir, cover once more, and cook for 20 to 30 minutes, or until the figs are mushy and translucent, stirring every 5 minutes or so to prevent sticking.… Read More

Continue Reading

Pomegranate-Jalapeño Jelly

This recipe creates a transparent, ruby red substance with a subtly sweet and hot flavor.

4 cups extracted pomegranate juice
¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
12 jalapeño peppers, seeded and chopped
1 package powdered pectin
4 cups sugar

Place pomegranate juice, lemon juice, and jalapeños in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Strain the juice and return it to the saucepan; add the pectin and bring to a rolling boil.

Add sugar and return to a rolling boil, then boil hard for 1 minute; remove from heat and skim if necessary. Pour into hot, sterilized jars, leaving ¼ inch head space.

Process 5 minutes in a boiling water bath. Yield: About 10 half-pints

Serving suggestion: Spread crackers or toasted baguettes with fromage blanc and place a small dollop of pomegranate jelly on top.

Read More
Continue Reading

Blackberry Vinegar

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma’s The Art of Preserving: Sweet & savory recipes to enjoy seasonal produce year-round.

½ cup fresh mint leaves (optional), thoroughly rinsed, patted dry, and roughly chopped

4 cups white wine vinegar or rice vinegar
3 cups blackberries, crushed
Equipment:
A large, clean, nonreactive bowl
A nonreactive saucepan
2 one-pint bottles, sterilized just before using

In the saucepan, warm the vinegar over low heat until hot but not yet simmering; do not let it boil. Remove from the heat. Place the blackberries and the mint, if using, in the bowl. Pour in the hot
vinegar and stir to combine. Set aside to cool. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2–4 weeks; the longer the vinegar stands, the stronger the flavor will be. Gently stir the vinegar
every few days to blend the flavors.

Strain the vinegar through a fine-mesh sieve and then through a coffee filter. Using a funnel, pour the filtered vinegar into hot, sterilized bottles. Cover tightly and store at room temperature for up to 2 months.

Read More
Continue Reading

Twitter