Archive | Entrees

Chef Colleen’s Harvest-Stuffed Acorn Squash

From the story A Vegan Holiday Feast, Illustration by Julia Cost

 

Serves 8

4 acorn squash, halved lengthwise and seeds removed
1 tablespoon olive oil (may substitute 2 tablespoons water for sautéing)
2 medium onions, chopped
4 stalks celery, diced
1½ cups cooked brown rice
1 cup cooked wild rice
1 cup raw or toasted pecans, coarsely chopped (or walnuts, almonds, or chestnuts)
½ cup diced dried apricots and/or raisins
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon ground cardamom
¼ teaspoon ground cloves
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
½ teaspoon salt, or to taste
Maple syrup (optional)

Preheat oven to 375°. 

Place the squash halves, cut-side down, onto nonstick baking sheets. There is no need to oil the squash. Bake for 30 minutes. The squash may not be fully fork-tender, but it will eventually be returned to the oven to cook all the way through.  

Meanwhile, in a sauté pan, cook the chopped onions in olive oil (or water) until transparent. Add the celery and sauté a couple of minutes. Remove from heat, and add to a large mixing bowl, along with the cooked rice, pecans, apricots, and/or raisins, ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, cloves, pepper, and salt.… Read More

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Homemade Turkey Soup

From Holiday Leftover Tips by StopFoodWaste


3 cups cooked turkey meat, chopped
Leftover bones from a 10–12 pound turkey
1 gallon (16 cups) water or broth
1 large onion, chopped
4 carrots and 1 stalk of celery, chopped
4 cloves peeled garlic, minced
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 pound of fresh spinach or kale, chopped

Place turkey bones in a 2-gallon stockpot, add water or broth. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 2 hours. Remove bones. Sauté onions, carrots, and celery until tender. Add garlic and cook for 2 minutes. Add to stockpot along with salt and pepper. Cook for 20 minutes. Add the fresh greens. Bring soup back to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer for 20 minutes. Add chopped turkey meat, simmer until warm, serve.

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Chef Nora Dunning’s Drip Line Shrimp and Grits

From the story Nora Dunning at Drip Line by Alix Wall

Make the sambal ahead. You’ll have enough for multiple servings of this dish, which is a favorite among Drip Line customers.

Photo by Alix Wall

Serves 4

For the sambal
3 large shallots, roughly chopped
3 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
6 Fresno peppers, roughly chopped
3 chile de árbol, soaked in hot water, roughly chopped
1 teaspoon belacan (shrimp paste), optional
3 tablespoons cooking oil
1 teaspoon tamarind paste
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon sugar

Blend shallots, garlic, ginger, peppers, and belacan (if using) in an electric blender to paste consistency. Heat cooking oil over medium-low to medium heat and sauté chile paste until fragrant, stirring constantly. Add tamarind paste, salt, and sugar to taste. Cook, stirring constantly, until paste has turned a darker red, 15–20 minutes. (Oil may separate, and that’s OK.) Set aside to cool.

For the coconut grits
4 cups water
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup coarse yellow or white grits
1 cup coconut milk
¼ teaspoon ground white pepper

Bring water and salt to a boil in a heavy saucepan. Add grits gradually and begin stirring. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook, stirring frequently until all the water has absorbed and grits have thickened.… Read More

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Saha’s Wild Mushroom Knaffe

From Saha Come to Berkeley by Sarah Henry, Photo by Kala Minko

Knaffe is one of many names for a type of Middle Eastern shredded phyllo dough, as well as for traditional desserts that feature it. At Saha, chef/owner Mohamed Aboghanem serves a knaffe dessert that is very traditional, but he wanted to create an equally exciting vegan savory option for his menu. He put the pastry over a bottom layer of a Yemeni farina cake called bisbusa (also spelled basbousa). Note: The frozen pastry can be purchased at most Greek or Middle Eastern stores, and if you can’t find it, try asking for “kataifi.” 

Serves 4

Chermoula Marinade 
(for use in the Knaffe Sauce)
½ bunch cilantro, roughly chopped
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup lemon juice
1½ teaspoons ground ginger
1½ teaspoons paprika
1½ teaspoons cinnamon
1½ teaspoons turmeric
1½ teaspoons caraway seeds
1 tablespoon minced garlic
Salt and pepper

Blend all ingredients in a food 
processor until smooth.

Knaffe Sauce
2 tablespoons chermoula marinade
2 tablespoons tomato sauce or diced fresh tomatoes
1 teaspoon honey
1 cup coconut milk

Mix ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Turn heat down to a simmer and reduce for 3 minutes.… Read More

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Chef Tu David Phu’s Lemongrass Beef

From Flavors of Home by Alix Wall


“I always get a lot of questions on how to use lemongrass. The most common remark is, ‘I never seem to extract the lemongrass flavor.’ My answer is that you have to use a lot of lemongrass, and that you will either have to bruise the stalk or chop it very finely. 

“People also ask, ‘Which fish sauce do I use? How do I apply it?’ I prefer Three Crab brand fish sauce for adding to sauces that won’t be cooked, since the brand seems to lose its salty flavor with long cooking. Squid brand fish sauce is saltier and is great for marinades.” —Chef Tu David Phu

1 stalk lemongrass
3 tablespoons Squid brand fish sauce 
1 tablespoon organic sugar
5 whole garlic cloves, peeled
1 pound filet mignon, tri-tip, or skirt steak

Prepare lemongrass by cutting away the bottom half inch of the stalk. (This part is very woody and should be saved for broths or soups.) Cut the stalks into ½-inch segments and chop finely in a food processor. Add garlic cloves, fish sauce, and sugar. Blend to a fine paste, about 1 minute. Place beef into a zip-top bag with the marinade, making sure to coat all of the beef.… Read More

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Cambodian-Style Chicken Salad

Nite Yun’s Nyam Sach Moan

From Noodle Soup Epiphanies
by Sarah Henry, photography by Robin Jolin


(Cambodian-style chicken salad)
This Khmer dish is served at festive occasions, such as weddings, New Year’s parties, and other celebrations. The fish sauce gives it a distinctly Cambodian flavor. Yun gives it a Northern California twist by including seasonal greens and other vegetables beyond the common cabbage.
Serves 4–6

1 chicken breast
2 cups chicken stock
2 cloves garlic, crushed
4–5 sprigs thyme

For sweet fish sauce dressing:
¼ cup fish sauce
¼ cup vinegar
¼ cup sugar
1 cup water
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced

For salad:
½ head cabbage, shredded
2 handfuls of loose organic greens (mizuna or arugula)
2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced
1 bunch mint, leaves only
1 bunch Thai basil, leaves only
1 Persian cucumber, thinly sliced
1 bird’s eye chili, chopped
2 tablespoons crushed roasted peanuts

To poach the chicken breast, place stock, garlic, and thyme into a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, add chicken, return to boil, and then reduce heat to low. Simmer, covered, for 15 minutes or until chicken is just cooked through. Turn off heat and leave chicken in liquid for 5 minutes. Remove meat from liquid and allow to cool on a plate.… Read More

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Lo Coco’s Linguine Tutto Mare

From Growing Up with Giovanni LoCoco
by Mary Tillson and Cheryl Angelina Koehler

Photo courtesy of Lo Coco

Suzanne Lo Coco says her father was as proprietary about his fish broth recipe as he was about the one for the family pizza dough, and she risks causing him to turn over in his grave if she reveals anything more than that he made the broth using a whole rock cod. Regardless of whether you make your own or buy a good prepared stock from your local fishmonger, be sure to simmer it with some saffron threads.

Serves 6

1½ pounds Manila clams, rinsed well
1 pound black mussels, rinsed well
12 extra-large jumbo scallops (or 2–3 per person), sliced ¼-inch thick
12 prawns (or 2–3 per person), peeled and deveined
1 cup fish broth (homemade or purchased) with 1 teaspoon saffron threads added
1 head garlic, peeled
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
¼ cup chopped Italian parsley (set aside 2 tablespoons for assembly)
¾ cup dry white wine (avoid chardonnay)
1½–2 whole lemons
½ cup water, or more as needed
½ cup crushed San Marzano or other pear-shaped tomatoes
3–4 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons chopped fresh sweet basil
1 pound linguine (At Lo Coco’s, we prefer the Italian De Cecco brand)
Salt and pepper to taste
Dash chili flakes (optional)

This recipe requires about 45–60 minutes of cooking time, provided you have accomplished all the prep tasks such as cleaning the seafood.… Read More

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Fennel and Chicken Braised with Lemon

La Vie Rustic: Cooking and Living in the French Style 
by Georgeanne Brennan

Published by Weldon Owen
Photography by Sara Remington
 
Fennel is good both raw and cooked. Cooking transforms its distinct licorice flavor into an almost-sweet back note. From the garden, I like to use very young fennel for pickles and the larger, more robust bulbs for gratins and in braised dishes like this one. Since I have Meyer lemon trees at my house in California, I use them here, though any variety will work. 
 
Serves 4
 
1 large or 2 medium fennel bulbs with stalks and fronds 
2 lemons, preferably Meyer, halved then cut into 3 pieces 
1 teaspoon sea salt 
6 chicken thighs, with or without skin 
2 cloves garlic, minced 
1 teaspoon dried oregano 
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper 
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 
½ cup dry white wine 
2 tablespoons grated lemon zest 
¼ cup green olives, pitted 
 
Trim the stalks from the fennel, reserving the lacy tips of the fronds for garnish. Cut the fennel bulb lengthwise into ¼-inch slices—the slices will look like hands. Cut the fennel “hands” lengthwise into ½-inch slices. Set aside. 
 
Put the cut lemons in a bowl and sprinkle with the salt.… Read More

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Wild Mushroom Stew with Polenta for a Ski-Touring Dinner

From Roadside Diaries: Sierra Adventures, Part I  by Cheryl Koehler

There is no reason not to have a gourmet feast while out in the wilderness when one can choose a dish like this made with durable lightweight tools and ingredients. The presentation makes a great impression on fellow campers. Serves 4 (or maybe only 2, if they are extremely hungry). (This recipe is adapted from The Cooking of South-West France by Paula Wolfert.)

For the Stew

1 ounce dried wild mushrooms
1 pound fresh mushrooms, one variety, or a mixture
(substitute an additional 2 ounces dried mushrooms if you don’t want to pack in fresh ones)
3 tablespoons olive oil (or duck fat)
3 ounces prosciutto or dry ham (such as Westphalian), chopped
2 shallots, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
5 sun-dried tomatoes, chopped
¾ cup white wine
Salt and pepper, to taste
2 – 4 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1 lemon

For the Polenta

½ cup stone-ground cornmeal or polenta (you might want to use the quick-cooking variety)
2 cups water

Place dried wild mushrooms in a bowl with enough hot water to cover. After they have soaked for about 30 minutes, remove from soaking water and set aside as you strain soaking water through a coffee filter to remove the grit.… Read More

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