Archive | Entrees

Bay Wolf Fennel Crusted and Stuffed Pork Rib Roast

From the story What’s in Season? Fennel by Barbara Kobsar

This recipe come to us from Bay Wolf Restaurant in Oakland, where monthly menus highlight the season’s prime ingredients, often following traditional uses from the regional cuisines of the Mediterranean. Michael Wild, founding owner and executive chef, confirms our accolades for fennel and dedicates a whole month to this versatile vegetable.

roasted

 

Bay Wolf Chef de Cuisine Louis Le Gassic used to work at a local butcher shop where he became an expert in preparing meats, such as this rib end pork roast. He recommends asking your butcher to french and butterfly the roast for you. However, when Edible East Bay asked to watch, Le Gassic had on hand a roast that had not been frenched and butterflied, so we were able to photograph the whole process.

Ingredients

1 ten-rib end pork roast, frenched and butterflied
10 tablespoons fennel seed, toasted and ground
Salt and pepper
1 bulb fennel, cut ⅛ inch thick
Olive oil
String

pork-prep

Instructions

1. Le Gassic “frenches” the roast by carving the meat away from the bone ends.

2. To “butterfly,” he slices part way down the length of the roast to lay it open flat on the cutting board.… Read More

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Tian of Fennel and Kabocha 

From the story What’s in Season? Fennel by Barbara Kobsar

This recipe come to us from Bay Wolf Restaurant in Oakland, where monthly menus highlight the season’s prime ingredients, often following traditional uses from the regional cuisines of the Mediterranean. Michael Wild, founding owner and executive chef, confirms our accolades for fennel and dedicates a whole month to this versatile vegetable.

Bay Wolf Chef de Cuisine Louis Le Gassic

Bay Wolf Chef de Cuisine Louis Le Gassic

2 bulbs fennel cut into ¼ inch slices
½ kabocha peeled and seeded and sliced into ¼ inch slices
1 small red onion sliced
3 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and pepper
4 tablespoons water
3 tablespoons breadcrumbs
4 tablespoon grated Reggiano

Toss the cut fennel, kabocha and red onion in 2 tablespoons of olive oil and season well with salt and pepper. Place into an ovenproof baking dish and drizzle the water throughout the dish. Put into a preheated 350-degree oven and bake for 30 to 40 minutes until the fennel and kabocha are soft.

Top with breadcrumbs and Reggiano. Return to oven and bake until golden brown. Serve hot.

Serves 8

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Wild Green Saag

From Menu for a Wild Day by Kevin Feinstein

Saag is an Indian dish that uses greens and a combination of spices. My version is very California-ized.

1 onion
1 “bunch” dandelion greens
½ “bunch” stinging nettles
1 “bunch” wild mustard greens
Ghee, butter, or olive oil (use a very generous amount, dish should be oily)
Curry powder
Salt to taste

Sauté onion in butter. Carefully add stinging nettles, dandelion greens, and wild mustard. Cook until soft, adding curry powder and salt to taste. Eat with bread (naan), or rice.

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Chiles en Nogada

From Cooking with Walnuts by Devany Vickery-Davidson

Photograph: Devany Vickery-Davidson

Photograph: Devany Vickery-Davidson

In this recipe, walnuts are hidden in the luscious sauce. I first learned how to make Chiles en Nogada while in cooking school in Cuernavaca Mexico. This is a signature dish of the Morelos region and it is traditionally made for the Christmas holidays. It represents the flag of Mexico, with the red, green and white colors.

This recipe serves 8 people and takes many hours to prepare, but it is well worth the effort. The chiles may be prepared and the stuffing made a couple of days in advance; store them separately, covered and refrigerated. Complete the sauce shortly before serving, since it will discolor if prepared too far ahead.

Advance preparation—walnuts:
2 cups (7 ounces) walnut halves and pieces, you’ll need 50 about 1½ pounds) very fresh walnuts in their shells

If using mature-green walnuts, allow 1½ to 2 hours to prepare. Break away the soft, green, outer layer with your hands. Working with 5 or 6 at a time, crack open the nuts, remove the meats in the largest pieces possible. Drop the walnut pieces into a small pan of boiling water, immediately remove with a slotted spoon to a paper towel, then peel.… Read More

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Mikan Tilapia

From the story For the Sake of Saké

By Serena Bartlett

Photo by Serena Bartlett

Photo by Serena Bartlett

This recipe is a wonderful light summer salad that brings out the flavors of the mizuna (Japanese mustard green) with citrus and the crispy fish. Mikan is the Japanese word for orange, one of the handful of words I’ve managed to remember after living there for some time several years ago. Mizuna is easy to grow in your garden, and is ready for harvest in only a few weeks. The use of oat bran instead of panko breadcrumbs gives this dish more nutrition and fiber. It can be served as a light lunch, or as a complement to another dish for a heartier meal.

2 tilapia filets, cut into approximately 15 2-inch pieces
⅔ cup organic canola oil
1 egg
1 tablespoon fume furikake (Japanese
seasoning containing bonito and nori)
3 tablespoons sesame seeds, black or white
⅓ cup ottogi Korean pancake mix or
okonomiyaki Japanese pancake mix
pinch of kosher salt
5 tablespoons oat bran
1 bunch mizuna
1 bunch baby spinach leaves
1 orange
⅓–½ Japanese cucumber

dressing:
3 tablespoons orange juice with pulp
Juice of 1 small lemon
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon rice vinegar
1 tablespoon honey, room-temperature
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
Kosher salt and fresh-ground pepper to taste

Whisk the egg in a bowl with the fumi furikake and set aside.… Read More

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Squash Blossom Risotto

 

 

Photo by Cheryl Koehler

Photo by Cheryl Koehler

By Barbara Llewellyn Catering and Event Planning

2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 cup chopped yellow onion
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 pound risotto
1 pound assorted summer squash: ½ pound grated, ½ pound diced
5 cups chicken stock
½ cup white wine
2 teaspoons chopped garlic
½ cup Parmesan cheese
6 squash blossoms

Bring chicken stock to a boil. Grate ½ pound of squash into a bowl (use large grate) add 2 squash blossoms and pour heated stock over. Cover and steep 15-20 minutes. Strain stock into sauce pan and gently reheat squash-infused stock. Over medium heat, in a heavy sauté pan, heat olive oil and 1 tablespoon butter. Add chopped onions and sauté until translucent (approx. 3 minutes). Add salt and pepper. Add half of diced squash and sauté 3 minutes. Add garlic. Stir in risotto. Sauté for 2 minutes. Add white wine and stir. Add stock, one cup at a time and stir until each cup of liquid is incorporated. In a separate sauté pan, heat oil and add remaining diced squash, sauté for 3-5 minutes.

When risotto is ready, add 1 tablespoon butter and Parmesan cheese.… Read More

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Squash Blossom ‘Poppers’

Photo by Cheryl Koehler

Photo by Cheryl Koehler

By Barbara Llewellyn Catering and Event Planning

12 unopened squash blossoms (edge of tip removed)
½ cup cream cheese, room temperature
½ cup goat cheese, room temperature
2 tablespoons heavy cream
2 teaspoon each: chopped chive, parsley, thyme, dill
½ teaspoon ground pepper
1 teaspoon salt

for batter:
4 egg whites beaten to soft peaks
½ cup milk
½ cup flour
½ teaspoon salt

Mix cheeses, cream, herbs and salt and pepper together with a whisk until creamy. Fill a pastry bag and pipe in cheese mixture (approx. ½ tablespoon) into each blossom. Push tip with finger to seal.

Mix flour and milk, add salt. Gently fold into egg whites. Dip filled blossom into batter and fry in oil (350 degrees) for 2 minutes or until golden. Drain on paper towels.

Sprinkle with lemon zest and parsley and serve warm.

Barbara Llewellyn Catering & Event Planning
434 25th St., Oakland
(510) 832-1967
www.BarbaraLlewellyn.com

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Pasta with Cherry Tomatoes and Ricotta Salata or Manouri

From the story The Happy Forever Community Garden Bears Fruit
by Simona Carini

sungold

Photo by Carole Topalian

Author’s own recipe, which she could never make with the garden’s Sungold tomatoes, because her husband ate them as soon as she brought home a freshly picked batch. I originally used ricotta salata, but then I discovered manouri, a soft Greek cheese made from full-fat sheep’s milk, and found that it works well in this recipe.

1 pound of short pasta (penne, gemelli, etc.)
⅓ pound ricotta salata or manouri (Greek cheese)
1 dry pint cherry tomatoes, halved
Salt, to taste
A few leaves of fresh basil, shredded

Bring a pot of water to rolling boil and toss the pasta into it. Place the ricotta or manouri in a serving bowl and use a fork to break it into small pieces. Add 1–2 tablespoons of hot water from the pot and work it into the cheese. Add the halved tomatoes to the bowl and salt to taste. Cook the pasta until it is firm to the bite (al dente), drain thoroughly and pour into the serving bowl. Sprinkle the basil over the pasta. Toss well: the heat of the pasta will soften the tomatoes, which will release their juice.… Read More

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Frittata Di Zucchine

From the story The Happy Forever Community Garden Bears Fruit
by Simona Carini

frittata-erase

Photo by Simona Carini

Author’s own interpretation of a classic Italian dish. I like frittata with lots of zucchini and the recipe below satisfies my personal taste. The recipe can be varied to use more eggs or less zucchini, or another type of summer squash. Adjust cooking time as needed by watching carefully over the pan.

Olive oil
¼ cup minced onion
1 pound zucchini, cut into ⅛ inch-thick slices
(if zucchini are more than 1 inch in diameter, cut in half or quarters lengthwise)
Freshly ground pepper (optional)
5 extra-large eggs (or 4 eggs and 2 egg whites)
¼ cup milk
Salt to taste

Preheat the broiler. Generously spray with olive oil the bottom of a 10-inch frying pan with an oven-resistant handle. Add the onion and sauté for a few minutes until colored. Add the zucchini slices and cook over low heat until they are slightly soft (about 15 minutes), stirring often.

Break the eggs in a small bowl and beat lightly with a fork. Add the milk and salt to taste and beat for a few more seconds.

Optionally sprinkle some pepper over the zucchini and stir.… Read More

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The “Shehabi” Burrito

chair-across2

From the story: Exploring Culture and Conversion Through Food by Anisa Abeytia

One day we invited a Palestinian family over and I made Moroccan food. They did not know what to make of it. The children of the family told me, somewhat disappointedly, that they thought we would have Mexican food. I laughed since they assumed I was from Mexico. They wanted burritos. So I invited them back and made them “Mexican” food. Later that week I ran into them and they told me with beaming faces that they made burritos for their after-school snack, but they used fava beans. Fava beans are popular in the Middle East and Morocco and I loved their addition. I added a few things myself to this quick and very portable food.

1 can fava beans (available at Halal Market)
½ cup shredded Monterey Jack and Cheddar cheeses
½ cup salad mix or shredded cabbage
6 sprouted corn or wheat tortillas

Condiments to taste:
Harissa (a Moroccan hot sauce available at Halal Market)
Guacamole with a hint of mint (an idea from Rebecca Katz)
Yogurt instead of sour cream
Merguez (This spicy Moroccan sausage, available at Halal Market, is an excellent substitute for chorizo. )

Serves 4–6

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