Archive | Entrees

Black Futsu in Green Curry Sauce

At Sea Salt, they love black futsu for the “fudge-like” texture of its golden flesh, which has a rich taste resembling hazelnuts, and for the edible skin that gets somewhat crisp when roasted.

1 large black futsu squash, cut into 1-inch-thick half moons
6 tablespoons butter
Salt
½ medium-sized onion, chopped
1 two-inch piece fresh ginger, minced
2 stalks lemongrass (Cut away and discard the green portions and then bruise the remaining portion with the back of a knife before slicing thinly.)
3 green apples, peeled and diced
Zest of 2 limes
2 tablespoons green curry paste
2 cans coconut milk
½ cup cream (optional)
1 bunch cilantro leaves, chopped
(Reserve a few whole sprigs for garnish.)

Preheat oven to 350°. Clarify 2 tablespoons butter and use it to coat the squash segments. Lay them on a baking sheet, salt lightly, and roast until the squash is soft and its skin is crisp. Meanwhile, melt the rest of the butter in a saucepan and sauté onion, ginger, lemongrass, and apple until soft. Allow to cool and then pureé in a blender or food processor along with the lime zest, curry paste, coconut milk, cream, and cilantro. Just before serving, gently heat the curry sauce while arranging the roasted squash slices onto plates.… Read More

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Mostaccioli con Mandorle

Honey Cookies Filled with Almonds, Cocoa, and Anisette From My Calabria: Rustic Cooking from Italy’s Undiscovered South (Norton, 2010), by Rosetta Costantino with Janet Fletcher, © 2010 by Rosetta Costantino and Janet Fletcher.

Used with permission.

In a discussion about her book, Rosetta mentioned that there were quite a few recipes, especially in the dolci (desserts) chapter, that her editor wanted omitted because they were deemed too esoteric. Indeed, most of the recipes that made the cut will be highly accessible to most people who enjoy spending quality time in the kitchen. But Rosetta seems to have found various ways to give readers a nibble here and there of the esoterica. In the headnote to this recipe, she explains that mostaccioli,

“Calabria’s most beloved holiday cookies” might also be “among the region’s oldest sweets, judging from their primitive nature.” She goes on to describe the most traditional version as being made with nothing but flour and honey that’s mixed into a stiff dough, rolled flat, and cut into whimsical shapes before being baked. “Calabrian children learn to suck slowly on these jaw-breaking cookies until they soften.”

As she describes the traditional decorating techniques, one starts to understand the degree to which Calabrians go in their hand crafting of food:

“Mostaccioli are never frosted but are charmingly decorated with hatch marks and tiny squares of shiny colored tinfoil that you remove before eating.Read More

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Blueberry Pickled Fish

Any meat or fat that is stored in blueberries will become pickled, developing a unique color and flavor within a few days to a week.  Clean and gut some fat trout or whitefish and then hang it to dry for three days. Hanging and drying are necessary to toughen the fish so it won’t fall apart.

Cut the fish into 2- by 4-inch pieces, removing any bloody or spoiled pieces. Mix this into a large bowl or jar filled with blueberry juice or juicy blueberries (fresh, or stored from last year). You’ll need enough juice so that the fish is completely submerged and can be easily stirred.

Keep cold and stir gently each day. It will be ready to eat when the color goes all the way through the fish. To check, cut a piece and see if the center is purple.

Eat the berries, juice, and fish all together as pickles with a meal, or with sugar for dessert.

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Warm Shelling Bean Salad with Grilled Shrimp

Adapted from Eating Local: The Cookbook Inspired by America’s Farmers

Shelling beans should be in good supply this season as growers have stepped up production to meet rising demand. When you purchase shrimp for this recipe, look for Pacific Coast wildcaught
pink shrimp, which are a Best Choice according to the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s SeafoodWATCH program (montereybayaquarium.org). If you can find wild-caught shrimp from the Gulf of Mexico, purchasing them will be a way of helping support the fishermen impacted by the BP oil spill.

2 pounds fresh cranberry beans, cannellini beans, black-eyed peas, crowder peas, or other shelling
beans
½ yellow onion
3 cloves garlic, halved lengthwise, plus 1 large clove, finely minced
4 thyme sprigs
1½ quarts water
Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
½ large red onion, halved again through the stem end, then very thinly sliced
¼ cup minced fresh Italian parsley
12 fresh basil leaves, torn into smaller pieces
2 innermost celery ribs, thinly sliced
1½ cups halved cherry tomatoes, preferably red and gold types
Red wine vinegar
18 large shrimp (about ¾ pound total), peeled and deveined
1 lemon

Remove the beans from their pods; you should have 3–3½ cups.… Read More

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Festive Dumplings

Adapted from The Asian Grandmothers Cookbook
by Patricia Tanumihardja

This dessert is eaten during festivals and celebrations, including weddings and Chinese New Year, and is symbolic of
family unity and harmony. Happy Year of the Tiger!

2 cups glutinous rice flour, (such as Koda Farms Mochiko Blue Star
Brand Sweet Rice Flour), plus more for dusting
⅓ to ½ cup cold water
¼ cup brown sugar
Ginger Syrup (recipe follows)

Put the rice flour in a mixing bowl. Gradually add water and mix until the dough is stiff and no longer sticks to your fingers. Keep in mind that the dough won’t be as pliable as dough made with all-purpose flour. Cover the dough with a damp cloth as you work, since it dries out very quickly.

Dust a large plate with rice flour and glove your hands with flour. Pinch off a walnut-size piece of dough (about ¾ inch across) and flatten into a circle about 2 inches in diameter. Cup the dough in your palm and place ⅛ teaspoon brown sugar in the center. Pinch the edges together to fully enclose the sugar and then roll into a 1-inch ball. Place the dumpling on the plate. Repeat with the remaining dough and sugar.… Read More

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Yuba Rolls with Koda Kokuho Rose Rice

From Hodo Soy Beanery, 510.464.2977, hodosoy.com

Hodo is one of a very few producers in the U.S. of yuba, the tender “skin” that forms on the top of heated soymilk. The skin is pulled off the vats in sheets, and these can then be used in various ways in your kitchen. Shredded, they are great in stir-fries or salads, and they can also be cut in the form of noodles and fried or used as a wrap, both of which are done in the following recipe.

1 cup Koda Kokuho Rose rice
(white or brown)
2 cups water
4 sheets fresh Hodo Soy yuba
1 small jicama root, julienned
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons soy sauce or
tamari

Cook rice with water in a steam rice cooker or on the stovetop. Finished rice should be a bit moist.

Cut 1 sheet of fresh yuba into thin strips. Stir-fry jicama strips in olive oil until they sweat (4–5 minutes). Add soy
sauce. Add strips of fresh yuba and stir-fry until yuba is slightly brown (4–5 minutes)

Unroll remaining yuba sheets one at a time onto a 6 x 8-inch sushi mat. Spread cooked rice and then spread stir-fried jicama and yuba strips onto the yuba.… Read More

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Stir-Fried Beef with Mustard Greens

Adapted from The Asian Grandmothers Cookbook
by Patricia Tanumihardja

1 pound flank steak or top sirloin
1 plump stalk lemongrass trimmed, bruised, and halved crosswise
2 cloves garlic, minced
1½-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and cut lengthwise into 6 slices
1½ teaspoons salt
8 ounces Asian mustard greens, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
(6 to 7 cups)
1 teaspoon sugar

Handle the beef partially frozen so that it is easier to cut (if it’s fresh, place in the freezer for about 30 minutes). Cut the beef along the grain into 1½-inch-thick strips. With your knife at an angle almost parallel to the cutting surface, slice the meat diagonally across the grain into ⅛-inch-thick slices. Then cut into about ⅛-inch slivers.

Preheat a large wok or skillet over high heat for about 1 minute. Add the beef, lemongrass, garlic, ginger, and salt. Stir-fry until the beef just loses its blush, 1 to 2 minutes. The beef will release its own juices that prevent it from sticking to the pan.

Add the mustard green stems and the sugar. Stir-fry for about 30 seconds, then add the leaves and stir-fry until the vegetables are tender and bright green, another minute. Taste and adjust seasonings if desired.… Read More

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Clay Pot Lemongrass-Steamed Fish (Pla Nueng Morh Din)

Adapted from The Asian Grandmothers Cookbook by Patricia Tanumihardja

Steaming whole fish on a lattice of lemongrass in a clay pot leaves it silky, tender, and imbued with a subtle
citrusy scent. Any white fish with natural fat, such as trout, Pacific cod, or striped bass, would work well in this simple Thai dish from Pranee Khruasanit Halvorsen, who learned to make it from her grandmother, Kimsua. Pranee remembers her grandma’s frugal nature: she would only use the discarded outer layers of the lemongrass to line the clay pot for this dish, saving the tender white core for others.

Clay pots are relatively inexpensive and are available in many Asian markets.

You will need a 12- to 14-inch clay pot for this recipe, or you can use a steamer.

¾- to 1-pound whole trout,
head and tail intact,
scaled, gutted, and
cleaned
4 plump stalks lemongrass, trimmed and bruised
1 tablespoon sea or kosher salt
½ cup water, or more as needed

Lay the fish flat on a cutting board. To ensure the fish cooks evenly, use a sharp knife to make 3 or 4
diagonal bone-deep cuts in the skin perpendicular to the backbone about 1 inch apart. Turn the fish
over and repeat.… Read More

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Porcini-braised rabbit with pappardelle, fava beans, and natural broth

This is a recipe that we at Luka’s have used with Jones Family Farm rabbits. It takes advantage of tasty spring ingredients like fava beans. —RM

4 rabbit legs (with thigh pieces)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 carrot, small dice
2 celery stalks, small dice
1 yellow onion, small dice
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 ounce dried porcini
4 sprigs thyme
1 bay leaf
1 cup white wine
8 cups chicken stock
1 pound fava beans, shelled
½ pound pappardelle pasta
½ pound fresh porcini, cut into ½-inch pieces
1 tablespoon butter
Salt
Pepper
Lemon juice (to taste)
Pecorino

Season rabbit with salt and pepper. Roast on a sheet tray at 375° for 20 minutes until golden brown.

Heat olive oil in a medium braising pot over medium-low heat. Sauté rabbit until golden brown.

Remove rabbit and set aside, and then sauté carrots, celery, onions, and garlic for 5 minutes. Add dried porcini and herbs and then deglaze the pan with the wine. Add rabbit and chicken stock, then bring to a simmer over low heat and cook for about 1 hour or until meat is tender.

Remove meat from the stock. Strain stock, discard vegetables, and reduce stock by a third to intensify flavors.… Read More

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Pork Loin Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Chard, and Sage

porkloin3

Recipe by Kirstin Jackson

When scalloped potatoes, yams, and pies are all supposed to be on the table in four hours, you may not want to bother with a bird that demands a lot of time and more oven space than the extra square footage a Hummer requires on the road. That’s where a juicy roasted pork loin stuffed with the requisite turkey fits the bill. Please don’t toss the cheese bits that leak from the center of the loin, they’re the ultimate comfort food and will sauce up the mashed potatoes or polenta on which you’ll rest the pork. There’s a good photo essay on how to “unroll” (or slice open) a pork loin at edibleeastbay.com. To find it, choose “explore” and “seasonal recipes,” then look at the Winter 2008 recipes for Bay Wolf Fennel Crusted and Stuffed Pork Rib Roast.

½ pound Italian turkey sausage, uncased

2 tablespoons canola oil

½ yellow onion, medium diced

1 bunch chard, washed, stems removed, and chopped finely

1½ tablespoon chopped sage

1 teaspoon lemon juice

3-pound boneless pork loin

2 teaspoons salt

Freshly ground pepper

3 ounces grated Havarti

Preheat oven to 350º

Bring a sauté pan to medium heat with 1 tablespoon canola oil.… Read More

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