Archive | Recipes

A Bowl of steaming Juk

By Su (mother) and Mia (daughter) Buchignani “Wow! This completely reminds me of something my mom would have made in her crockpot. It makes me feel like home.”—Melissa

A standard breakfast in our household was a big bowl of steaming juk. This rice porridge, which is also known as jook, hsi-fan, congee, or zhou, is made of white rice, often with the addition of glutinous (sticky) rice. It’s simmered for several hours until the rice grains break down and the porridge becomes smooth as silk.

Mia: My preferred accoutrement to dip in the porridge was you tiao, a long, golden-brown strip of deep-fried dough. To understand this savory fried donut, think Chinese churro without the sugar or the crimping. Sometimes you
tiao is served with hot soybean milk, but traditionally, it has been used for dipping and wiping up the morning juk before going off to work in the fields.
Every household has its own traditions regarding what is eaten with juk. Some are quite strict purists where others adopt an ‘anything-goes’ approach, using the juk as an extender for whatever can be found around the kitchen. Common accompaniments are pork, chicken, or abalone, as well as various vegetarian “mock meats”; salted or preserved duck eggs; bamboo shoots; and pickled tofu.… Read More

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Festive Dumplings

Adapted from The Asian Grandmothers Cookbook
by Patricia Tanumihardja

This dessert is eaten during festivals and celebrations, including weddings and Chinese New Year, and is symbolic of
family unity and harmony. Happy Year of the Tiger!

2 cups glutinous rice flour, (such as Koda Farms Mochiko Blue Star
Brand Sweet Rice Flour), plus more for dusting
⅓ to ½ cup cold water
¼ cup brown sugar
Ginger Syrup (recipe follows)

Put the rice flour in a mixing bowl. Gradually add water and mix until the dough is stiff and no longer sticks to your fingers. Keep in mind that the dough won’t be as pliable as dough made with all-purpose flour. Cover the dough with a damp cloth as you work, since it dries out very quickly.

Dust a large plate with rice flour and glove your hands with flour. Pinch off a walnut-size piece of dough (about ¾ inch across) and flatten into a circle about 2 inches in diameter. Cup the dough in your palm and place ⅛ teaspoon brown sugar in the center. Pinch the edges together to fully enclose the sugar and then roll into a 1-inch ball. Place the dumpling on the plate. Repeat with the remaining dough and sugar.… Read More

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Yuba Rolls with Koda Kokuho Rose Rice

From Hodo Soy Beanery, 510.464.2977, hodosoy.com

Hodo is one of a very few producers in the U.S. of yuba, the tender “skin” that forms on the top of heated soymilk. The skin is pulled off the vats in sheets, and these can then be used in various ways in your kitchen. Shredded, they are great in stir-fries or salads, and they can also be cut in the form of noodles and fried or used as a wrap, both of which are done in the following recipe.

1 cup Koda Kokuho Rose rice
(white or brown)
2 cups water
4 sheets fresh Hodo Soy yuba
1 small jicama root, julienned
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons soy sauce or
tamari

Cook rice with water in a steam rice cooker or on the stovetop. Finished rice should be a bit moist.

Cut 1 sheet of fresh yuba into thin strips. Stir-fry jicama strips in olive oil until they sweat (4–5 minutes). Add soy
sauce. Add strips of fresh yuba and stir-fry until yuba is slightly brown (4–5 minutes)

Unroll remaining yuba sheets one at a time onto a 6 x 8-inch sushi mat. Spread cooked rice and then spread stir-fried jicama and yuba strips onto the yuba.… Read More

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Properly Cooked Brown Rice

Excerpted from THE COMPLETE TASSAJARA COOKBOOK by Edward Espe Brown, © 2009. Published by
arrangement with Shambhala Publications, Inc., Boston. Shambhala.com

1 cup brown rice
2 cups water
½ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon butter or oil

Rinse and drain the rice, then soak it in the water for 1 hour (optional). Put both rice and water into a heavy saucepan.

Add salt and butter and bring to a boil. Immediately reduce the heat to its lowest setting and cover the pot with
a tight-fitting lid. Cook the rice for 45 minutes undisturbed.

Watch TV, prepare other dishes for dinner, or do your yoga asanas, but don’t look at the pot. The rice needs seclusion to turn out properly. To tell when it’s done just listen to the pot: no more bubbling, but a subtle yet distinct crackling or popping sound. The rice on the bottom is becoming toasted. Leave the pot tightly covered. Just before serving, gently fluff the grains with a fork.

If properly cooked and properly eaten (100 chews per mouthful), the brown rice will properly become you.

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Stir-Fried Beef with Mustard Greens

Adapted from The Asian Grandmothers Cookbook
by Patricia Tanumihardja

1 pound flank steak or top sirloin
1 plump stalk lemongrass trimmed, bruised, and halved crosswise
2 cloves garlic, minced
1½-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and cut lengthwise into 6 slices
1½ teaspoons salt
8 ounces Asian mustard greens, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
(6 to 7 cups)
1 teaspoon sugar

Handle the beef partially frozen so that it is easier to cut (if it’s fresh, place in the freezer for about 30 minutes). Cut the beef along the grain into 1½-inch-thick strips. With your knife at an angle almost parallel to the cutting surface, slice the meat diagonally across the grain into ⅛-inch-thick slices. Then cut into about ⅛-inch slivers.

Preheat a large wok or skillet over high heat for about 1 minute. Add the beef, lemongrass, garlic, ginger, and salt. Stir-fry until the beef just loses its blush, 1 to 2 minutes. The beef will release its own juices that prevent it from sticking to the pan.

Add the mustard green stems and the sugar. Stir-fry for about 30 seconds, then add the leaves and stir-fry until the vegetables are tender and bright green, another minute. Taste and adjust seasonings if desired.… Read More

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Clay Pot Lemongrass-Steamed Fish (Pla Nueng Morh Din)

Adapted from The Asian Grandmothers Cookbook by Patricia Tanumihardja

Steaming whole fish on a lattice of lemongrass in a clay pot leaves it silky, tender, and imbued with a subtle
citrusy scent. Any white fish with natural fat, such as trout, Pacific cod, or striped bass, would work well in this simple Thai dish from Pranee Khruasanit Halvorsen, who learned to make it from her grandmother, Kimsua. Pranee remembers her grandma’s frugal nature: she would only use the discarded outer layers of the lemongrass to line the clay pot for this dish, saving the tender white core for others.

Clay pots are relatively inexpensive and are available in many Asian markets.

You will need a 12- to 14-inch clay pot for this recipe, or you can use a steamer.

¾- to 1-pound whole trout,
head and tail intact,
scaled, gutted, and
cleaned
4 plump stalks lemongrass, trimmed and bruised
1 tablespoon sea or kosher salt
½ cup water, or more as needed

Lay the fish flat on a cutting board. To ensure the fish cooks evenly, use a sharp knife to make 3 or 4
diagonal bone-deep cuts in the skin perpendicular to the backbone about 1 inch apart. Turn the fish
over and repeat.… Read More

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Porcini-braised rabbit with pappardelle, fava beans, and natural broth

This is a recipe that we at Luka’s have used with Jones Family Farm rabbits. It takes advantage of tasty spring ingredients like fava beans. —RM

4 rabbit legs (with thigh pieces)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 carrot, small dice
2 celery stalks, small dice
1 yellow onion, small dice
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 ounce dried porcini
4 sprigs thyme
1 bay leaf
1 cup white wine
8 cups chicken stock
1 pound fava beans, shelled
½ pound pappardelle pasta
½ pound fresh porcini, cut into ½-inch pieces
1 tablespoon butter
Salt
Pepper
Lemon juice (to taste)
Pecorino

Season rabbit with salt and pepper. Roast on a sheet tray at 375° for 20 minutes until golden brown.

Heat olive oil in a medium braising pot over medium-low heat. Sauté rabbit until golden brown.

Remove rabbit and set aside, and then sauté carrots, celery, onions, and garlic for 5 minutes. Add dried porcini and herbs and then deglaze the pan with the wine. Add rabbit and chicken stock, then bring to a simmer over low heat and cook for about 1 hour or until meat is tender.

Remove meat from the stock. Strain stock, discard vegetables, and reduce stock by a third to intensify flavors.… Read More

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Roasted Butternut Squash Salad

butternutsalad1

Recipe by Kirstin Jackson

Forgo the brown sugar and let the sweetness of winter squash speak for itself this holiday in a salad with fresh Greek manouri cheese, arugula and frisée, roasted pecans, and tarragon. The sweetness of the buttery and floral cheese and squash make a nice contrast to the lemony vinaigrette, lightening up the often-heavy fall flavors considerably.

2 pounds butternut squash, peeled and diced into ¾-inch cubes

1 tablespoon olive oil

⅛ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

½ teaspoon salt

2 ½ ounces pecans

1 head frisée, trimmed and washed

2 handfuls arugula, washed

4 sprigs tarragon, picked

1 medium-sized shallot, chopped fine

1 tablespoon lemon juice

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

4 ounces manouri cheese, crumbled

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350º

Spread butternut squash cubes in a single layer over a sheet baking pan and drizzle the olive oil. Sprinkle with nutmeg and salt, and roast in oven for 20 to 25 minutes or until squash is tender. Set aside to cool. While squash is cooking, roast pecans on a pan in oven for 10 to 12 minutes. Let cool.

Place frisée, arugula, and tarragon leaves in a large mixing bowl along with roasted butternut squash.… Read More

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Pork Loin Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Chard, and Sage

porkloin3

Recipe by Kirstin Jackson

When scalloped potatoes, yams, and pies are all supposed to be on the table in four hours, you may not want to bother with a bird that demands a lot of time and more oven space than the extra square footage a Hummer requires on the road. That’s where a juicy roasted pork loin stuffed with the requisite turkey fits the bill. Please don’t toss the cheese bits that leak from the center of the loin, they’re the ultimate comfort food and will sauce up the mashed potatoes or polenta on which you’ll rest the pork. There’s a good photo essay on how to “unroll” (or slice open) a pork loin at edibleeastbay.com. To find it, choose “explore” and “seasonal recipes,” then look at the Winter 2008 recipes for Bay Wolf Fennel Crusted and Stuffed Pork Rib Roast.

½ pound Italian turkey sausage, uncased

2 tablespoons canola oil

½ yellow onion, medium diced

1 bunch chard, washed, stems removed, and chopped finely

1½ tablespoon chopped sage

1 teaspoon lemon juice

3-pound boneless pork loin

2 teaspoons salt

Freshly ground pepper

3 ounces grated Havarti

Preheat oven to 350º

Bring a sauté pan to medium heat with 1 tablespoon canola oil.… Read More

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Pear, Daikon, and Shiso Salad

daikons

This salad is a great way to use the hard Asian pears you find in the market this season. It was invented out of my sister’s late summer garden, where she had a bumper crop of daikon, a large Asian radish that, like all radishes, is a member of the large brassica family and thus kin to cabbage. Daikon is grown as both a spring and a fall crop, but if you can’t find it in the market, try substituting shredded cabbage. My sister also grows perilla, an Asian herb in the mint family better known to sushi-eaters by its Japanese name, shiso, which sometimes is translated on menus as “beefsteak leaf.” You could omit it and experiment with adding other fresh herbs, such as mint. Red shiso adds a distinctive pink tint and a flavor reminiscent of cinnamon, anise, and basil. We decided that the salad serves 8, but I could easily eat 2 portions and still go back for more.          —Cheryl Angelina Koehler

2 cups daikon, grated (or shredded cabbage)

½ teaspoon salt

1 clove garlic

2 cups pear, grated (choose hard but sweet, like Asian pears)

2 tablespoons lemon juice

40 red shiso leaves, cut in chiffonade (or mint)

1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar

1 tablespoon fresh ginger, grated

Grate daikon into a large bowl, then press it to squeeze out some of the liquid and drain.… Read More

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