Archive | Salad

Mâche salad with blueberries and toasted almonds

Courtesy of Rick DeBeaord, executive chef at Café Rouge

½ pound mâche
1 pint blueberries
1 cup almonds
½ teaspoon Espelette pepper
¼ cup chopped parsley
1 tablespoon Champagne vinegar
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
½ teaspoon salt

Place almonds on baking sheet and toast in 350˚ oven until golden brown, about 15 minutes.

Cool and chop roughly. Mix olive oil into vinegar with whisk then add salt and Espelette pepper.

When ready to serve toss all ingredients together and serve on chilled plates.

Serves 6.

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CUSTOM WEEDY GREENS MIX

Create your own weedy greens mix from the following suggestions. There are no correct amounts—just play and experiment. Your mix can last up to a week in the refrigerator in an airtight container.

Bull mallow (Malva nicaeensis)
Chickweed (Stellaria media)
Chicory (Cichorium intybus)
Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)
Lamb’s quarters (Chenopodium album)
Miner’s lettuce (Claytonia perfoliata)
Nettle (Urtica dioica)
Purslane (Portulaca oleracea)
Sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus)
Wild lettuce (Lactuca virosa or Lactuca serriola)

Add salad greens and/or baby spinach, kale, beet, or mustard greens from your garden or from the market. You might also add any herbs that strike your fancy, such as lemon thyme (pull leaves off the stem and add whole); chopped parsley or cilantro, chervil, tarragon, oregano, mint, and/or chives; and edible flower petals, such as from calendula, violets, or borage.

TIPS

• Pick vibrant looking weeds that are turgid (fat and vital) with unblemished leaves.

• If possible, harvest in the morning for long-lasting freshness.

• Baby weedy greens are milder and sweeter, whereas mature plants have a more bitter taste.

• Do not harvest in toxic areas, such as near busy streets (car fumes), adjacent to houses (most paint is toxic), or in any landscaped areas that you suspect might be maintained with chemicals.… Read More

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PRIMA’S SPINACH AND PERSIMMON SALAD WITH GORGONZOLA, TOASTED WALNUTS & BALSAMICO

Serves 6

6 generous handfuls baby spinach, washed and spun dry
2 Fuyu persimmons, peeled and thinly sliced
1/4 cup walnut halves and pieces, toasted
1/4 small red onion, thinly sliced, soaked in water and salt, and then squeezed dry
1/2 cup mountain Gorgonzola cheese, pinched into small pieces
Extra virgin olive oil
Good balsamic vinegar (We use “Riserva” by Sereni)
Lemon
Kosher salt

Lightly toss everything together with salt and oil. (Depending on the weight of the oil, about ½ a cup. But use common sense here-don’t over dress.)

Season with a few drops of lemon juice and enough balsamico to taste, but not to overwhelm-this completely depends on the brand.

Plate neatly and serve. Try this salad with a glass of good dry Riesling.

NOTE: In Italian, dressing is a verb not a noun.

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Warm Shelling Bean Salad with Grilled Shrimp

Adapted from Eating Local: The Cookbook Inspired by America’s Farmers

Shelling beans should be in good supply this season as growers have stepped up production to meet rising demand. When you purchase shrimp for this recipe, look for Pacific Coast wildcaught
pink shrimp, which are a Best Choice according to the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s SeafoodWATCH program (montereybayaquarium.org). If you can find wild-caught shrimp from the Gulf of Mexico, purchasing them will be a way of helping support the fishermen impacted by the BP oil spill.

2 pounds fresh cranberry beans, cannellini beans, black-eyed peas, crowder peas, or other shelling
beans
½ yellow onion
3 cloves garlic, halved lengthwise, plus 1 large clove, finely minced
4 thyme sprigs
1½ quarts water
Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
½ large red onion, halved again through the stem end, then very thinly sliced
¼ cup minced fresh Italian parsley
12 fresh basil leaves, torn into smaller pieces
2 innermost celery ribs, thinly sliced
1½ cups halved cherry tomatoes, preferably red and gold types
Red wine vinegar
18 large shrimp (about ¾ pound total), peeled and deveined
1 lemon

Remove the beans from their pods; you should have 3–3½ cups.… Read More

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Roasted Butternut Squash Salad

butternutsalad1

Recipe by Kirstin Jackson

Forgo the brown sugar and let the sweetness of winter squash speak for itself this holiday in a salad with fresh Greek manouri cheese, arugula and frisée, roasted pecans, and tarragon. The sweetness of the buttery and floral cheese and squash make a nice contrast to the lemony vinaigrette, lightening up the often-heavy fall flavors considerably.

2 pounds butternut squash, peeled and diced into ¾-inch cubes

1 tablespoon olive oil

⅛ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

½ teaspoon salt

2 ½ ounces pecans

1 head frisée, trimmed and washed

2 handfuls arugula, washed

4 sprigs tarragon, picked

1 medium-sized shallot, chopped fine

1 tablespoon lemon juice

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

4 ounces manouri cheese, crumbled

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350º

Spread butternut squash cubes in a single layer over a sheet baking pan and drizzle the olive oil. Sprinkle with nutmeg and salt, and roast in oven for 20 to 25 minutes or until squash is tender. Set aside to cool. While squash is cooking, roast pecans on a pan in oven for 10 to 12 minutes. Let cool.

Place frisée, arugula, and tarragon leaves in a large mixing bowl along with roasted butternut squash.… Read More

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Pear, Daikon, and Shiso Salad

daikons

This salad is a great way to use the hard Asian pears you find in the market this season. It was invented out of my sister’s late summer garden, where she had a bumper crop of daikon, a large Asian radish that, like all radishes, is a member of the large brassica family and thus kin to cabbage. Daikon is grown as both a spring and a fall crop, but if you can’t find it in the market, try substituting shredded cabbage. My sister also grows perilla, an Asian herb in the mint family better known to sushi-eaters by its Japanese name, shiso, which sometimes is translated on menus as “beefsteak leaf.” You could omit it and experiment with adding other fresh herbs, such as mint. Red shiso adds a distinctive pink tint and a flavor reminiscent of cinnamon, anise, and basil. We decided that the salad serves 8, but I could easily eat 2 portions and still go back for more.          —Cheryl Angelina Koehler

2 cups daikon, grated (or shredded cabbage)

½ teaspoon salt

1 clove garlic

2 cups pear, grated (choose hard but sweet, like Asian pears)

2 tablespoons lemon juice

40 red shiso leaves, cut in chiffonade (or mint)

1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar

1 tablespoon fresh ginger, grated

Grate daikon into a large bowl, then press it to squeeze out some of the liquid and drain.… Read More

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