Archive | Vegetarian/Vegan

Perfumed Matsutake Rice

From Urban Forager: Matsu=Pine, Take=Mushroom by Anthony Tassinello

3 cups Japanese rice
3 cups water
2 or 3 small “number one” matsutake
1 abura-age – fried tofu (optional)
¼ cup sake
¼ cup soy sauce

Begin by washing the rice in several changes of cold water, repeating the process until the water becomes clear. Drain the rice thoroughly. Add rice and water to rice cooker and let stand for 30 minutes. In the meantime clean the mushrooms of all loose dirt using a firm brush or paring knife. You may peel back a bit of the thin outer layer if overly dirty. Using the large holes of a box grater, shred the mushrooms lengthwise into long strands. Alternatively, if using your hands, pull apart into small rough pieces of the same size. If using the optional fried tofu, cut into strips. Add the mushrooms, tofu, sake and soy sauce to the rice cooker, cover and follow manufacturer’s instructions for cooking.

Serves 6 as part of a larger meal

Resist the urge to treat matsutake in a western style cooking fashion (i.e., sautéing or frying in fat) as the essence of the mushroom will be lost and will result in a bland, tough dish.… Read More

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CORE Kitchen’s Thai Zucchini Noodles

CORE Kitchen’s Thai Zucchini Noodles

CORE Kitchen’s Thai Zucchini Noodles (Photos by Carmen Silva)

Serves 2–4 as a main dish

2 medium zucchini
4 cups chopped broccoli
1 cup shredded carrots
1 cup diced cucumber
1 cup shredded red cabbage
3 tablespoons chopped mint
3 tablespoons chopped basil
3 tablespoons chopped scallion
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro
1 cup cauliflower rice (chop cauliflower into florets, then chop into small pieces using a food processor)
¼ cup toasted cashews

For sauce:
1 cup soaked almonds (soak overnight, then drain and rinse)
12 soaked dates (Bring water to a boil, turn off heat. De-pit dates, and soak for 30 minutes.)
1 cup coconut milk
¼ cup tahini
1½ tablespoons minced garlic
1 tablespoon peeled and diced ginger
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
¾ cup lime juice
1/3 cup coconut water

A spiralizer is a great tool, and can be purchased for around $20. Use it to spiralize your zucchini into noodles. Blanch noodles in boiling water for 10 seconds, then immediately transfer to the fridge to cool.

Blanch the broccoli for 1 minute (or steam for 5 minutes), then transfer immediately to a refrigerator to cool.

To prepare the sauce, add soaked almonds, soaked dates, coconut milk, tahini, garlic, ginger, cayenne pepper, lime juice, and coconut water into a blender and blend until incorporated.… Read More

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Savory Oatmeal

UC Berkeley Wellness Program dietitian Kim Guess, RD, describes this recipe as a “surprising crowd favorite” with students in her cooking classes. Add any other seasonal vegetables you like such as carrots, bell peppers, or asparagus. If steel cut oats aren’t available, substitute other grains like brown rice or quinoa (cooked according to package directions).

Ms. Guess offers more healthy and inspired recipes at guesswhoscooking.com.

Photo by Kim Guess

Photo by Kim Guess

Serves 4–6

1 cup steel cut oats
3–4 cups vegetable broth or water
Extra virgin olive oil or virgin coconut oil
1 yellow onion, diced
10 ounces mushrooms (button, crimini, or shiitake),
1 bunch greens, such as chard or spinach, chopped

Optional toppings:
Egg, poached or pan-fried
Diced chicken or other lean meat
Low-sodium tamari
Toasted sesame seeds or sliced almonds
Sliced green onion
Hot sauce or crushed red pepper

Combine oats and broth in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, for about 20 to 30 minutes or until oats have reached desired texture.

Meanwhile, heat a skillet over medium heat and add olive oil. Add diced onion and cook for 1 to 2 minutes. Add mushrooms (plus any other vegetables you like) and cook until onions become translucent.… Read More

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Emerald Glow

Edible-Juiced---22

Recipe courtesy of Super Juiced.

Emanne co-owner of Super Juiced says to make sure all produce is organic and preferably from a local farmers’ market.
Makes one 12-ounce serving

4 Swiss chard and/or collard leaves
6 leaves of romaine lettuce
3 stalks of celery
1 Granny Smith apple
1 handful of mint
Juice from half a lemon

When selecting a juicer find one with a large chute so you don’t have to spend extra time prepping produce to fit.
Alternate feeding greens down the chute with apples. This will help you get the most juice out.
Drink right away to maximize the nutritional benefit.

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Chipotle Pumpkin Soup Alchemy

squash

Related story:
What We Used to Eat: Decolonize Your Diet highlights the nutritional power of ancestral foods
Interview and Illustrations by Margo Rivera-Weiss

Adapted from Decolonize Your Diet: Plant-Based Mexican-American Recipes for Health and Healing

Calvo and Esquibel call this soup “alchemy” because the ingredients make magic together. Rich and creamy, it is a perfect soup for winter months. Chipotle adds a smoky note, but use only a little (even if you think you’re tough). Cinnamon adds flavor complexity and helps regulate blood glucose levels.

Makes 6 servings

1 7-pound cooking pumpkin or winter squash (or 3 15-ounce cans pumpkin purée)
1 white onion, chopped
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
4 garlic cloves, chopped
1 teaspoon cumin seeds, toasted and ground
1 teaspoon coriander seeds, toasted and ground
1–2 tablespoons chipotle en adobo (homemade or canned), minced
1 cinnamon stick, preferably Ceylon or canela Mexicana
4–6 cups vegetable stock
1 teaspoon dried oregano, preferably Mexican
1 teaspoon sea salt, to taste
¼ cup raw, hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas)
1 tablespoon lime juice
½ teaspoon maple syrup
6 leaves cilantro
½ cup Cashew Crema (optional)

Bake pumpkin or squash at 350° until soft (about 40 minutes), then peel, seed, and chop.… Read More

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Roasted Winter Vegetable Galette

galette_winter-vegetable

Veteran journalist Barbara Kobsar has authored two cookbooks focusing on traditional home-cooked meals using local produce. You’ll find her each week at the Walnut Creek Farmers’ Market selling her Cottage Kitchen jams and jellies made from farmers’ market produce.

Berkeley-based illustrator and musician Caroline H. Gould is a transplant from Brooklyn, New York. She is especially fond of illustrating desserts. carolinehgould.com

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Spaghetti col Tonno

Italian Flat Leaf Parsley

Italian Flat Leaf Parsley

From Happy Forever Community Gardener Gets Educated

by Simona Carini

Spaghetti col Tonno (pasta with tomato and tuna sauce, or how to use the parsley)

½ – 1 tablespoon olive oil
3 cloves of garlic, peeled
1 15-oz. can of organic tomato sauce
½ tablespoon anchovy paste (optional)
1 7.5 oz. can of tuna (low or minimal mercury, packed in its own juices)
1 lb. spaghetti
¼-cup minced fresh parsley

Put a large pot of water on to boil. Meanwhile pour the olive oil into a small saucepan and warm over very low heat. Add the garlic and let the oil absorb the garlic’s flavor for a few minutes. The cloves will darken in color, but they must not become dark brown.

Add the anchovy paste, if using, stirring it into the oil. Then add the tomato sauce and warm the mixture slowly to a simmer. Cover and allow the sauce to cook for 5 minutes.

Open the can of tuna and pour its contents into a small bowl. Flake the tuna with a fork and mix to stir the juices back in, then pour into the simmering tomato sauce. Stir well, then cover the pan and let the sauce simmer for 10 minutes.… Read More

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Shaved Fennel, Artichoke and Mushroom Salad with Reggiano

From the story What’s in Season? Fennel by Barbara Kobsar

This recipe come to us from Bay Wolf Restaurant in Oakland, where monthly menus highlight the season’s prime ingredients, often following traditional uses from the regional cuisines of the Mediterranean. Michael Wild, founding owner and executive chef, confirms our accolades for fennel and dedicates a whole month to this versatile vegetable.

fennel-salad-cut

 

2 fennel bulbs
Heart of 1 large artichoke
4-6 button mushrooms
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Juice of 1 Meyer lemon
Salt and pepper
Reggiano

With a mandoline shave the fennel, artichoke heart, and button mushrooms into a bowl as thinly as possible. Season with salt and pepper. Add the juice of the Meyer lemon and the olive oil. Toss and let stand for a few minutes. Toss in the Italian parsley and arrange onto salad plates. With a vegetable peeler, shave some Reggiano over the top of each plate to finish.

Serves 8

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Citrus Braised Fennel

From the story What’s in Season? Fennel by Barbara Kobsar

This recipe come to us from Bay Wolf Restaurant in Oakland, where monthly menus highlight the season’s prime ingredients, often following traditional uses from the regional cuisines of the Mediterranean. Michael Wild, founding owner and executive chef, confirms our accolades for fennel and dedicates a whole month to this versatile vegetable.

 

citrus-fennel-22 fennel bulbs
Chopped zest and juice of 4 oranges
1 tablespoon Champagne vinegar
2 tablespoon honey
2 thyme springs
1 cup white wine
black peppercorns
Olive oil
Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Cut fennel into ¼-inch slices, coat with olive oil and season well. Arrange in a single layer in an ovenproof dish. Roast the fennel for 20 minutes.

In the meantime, in a saucepan bring to a boil the orange juice, vinegar, honey, thyme and black peppercorns. Bring to a boil and reduce by half. Strain the orange juice mixture and pour over the fennel cook for another 20 minutes.

Remove the liquid left to a saucepan and reduce to a glaze, then pour back over the fennel.

Can be served hot or room temperature.

Serves 8

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Tian of Fennel and Kabocha 

From the story What’s in Season? Fennel by Barbara Kobsar

This recipe come to us from Bay Wolf Restaurant in Oakland, where monthly menus highlight the season’s prime ingredients, often following traditional uses from the regional cuisines of the Mediterranean. Michael Wild, founding owner and executive chef, confirms our accolades for fennel and dedicates a whole month to this versatile vegetable.

Bay Wolf Chef de Cuisine Louis Le Gassic

Bay Wolf Chef de Cuisine Louis Le Gassic

2 bulbs fennel cut into ¼ inch slices
½ kabocha peeled and seeded and sliced into ¼ inch slices
1 small red onion sliced
3 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and pepper
4 tablespoons water
3 tablespoons breadcrumbs
4 tablespoon grated Reggiano

Toss the cut fennel, kabocha and red onion in 2 tablespoons of olive oil and season well with salt and pepper. Place into an ovenproof baking dish and drizzle the water throughout the dish. Put into a preheated 350-degree oven and bake for 30 to 40 minutes until the fennel and kabocha are soft.

Top with breadcrumbs and Reggiano. Return to oven and bake until golden brown. Serve hot.

Serves 8

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